Guide to Evaluation of Library Collections cover

National Library Week Special-Professional Collection

Guide to the Evaluation of Library Collections
Collection Management and Development Guides
No. 2
Lockett, ed.
1989

This 1989 publication was sitting in a professional collection as of this writing. I would be surprised if anyone had even looked at this book in the last 20 years.

It is written in an organized format, like an outline. Easy for referencing, but boring in the way it looks. Obviously this one is much better. (Even though those lazy authors haven’t updated it for a new edition.)

You can already guess this one is long past it’s prime.

Time to weed the professional collection people!

Happy National Library Week

book cover of catcher in the

Catcher in the Rye turns to dust.

Catcher in the Rye
Salinger
Mass Market Publication 1964
Original copyright 1951

Another Swedish Death Cleaning find…

No, I do not think for one second that Catcher in the Rye is awful. (Please don’t take the name of this website literally.) Personal aside, this book isn’t one of my favorites, my initial reading as a teenager was the 1970s version of “meh”. I re-read it as an adult in my 30s, as a project to re-read classics from high school and college. Unlike other classic titles, my opinion didn’t change too much.

That said, this book is part of my Swedish death cleaning project and it is my husband’s book. Actually, his older sister had her name in the book and I believe he “borrowed” it when he was in high school. Whoops.

Despite any personal feelings about Catcher in the Rye, it went on my weed list because it fell completely apart when I pulled it out. Many of the pages crumbled right in my hands. I am willing to bet that we haven’t touched this book since we shelved it in our current home.

Weeding Case Study

Weeding in an Academic Library – a Case Study

A reader reached out and asked if they could share an anecdote about an interaction with a faculty member over their weeding process. We thought that was a great idea, and we welcome other case studies as well. Do you have a weeding story to share? Here are some ideas:

“My boss won’t let me weed” – How did you approach the boss, and what was their response?
“I took over a job from a long-time hoarder.” – How did you approach cleaning up that mess?
“I weeded something that turned out to be important.” – Oops! How did you remedy the situation?
“My library is starting a large weeding project.” – Did you create a weeding plan? What was the approach to get staff and patrons on board?

Below is a description of our first case study submitter’s interaction.

marriage of 2 times great grandparents in family bible

The Life Changing Magic of Library Maintenance

As a co-owner of this little corner of the Internet, I feel obliged to weigh in on Marie Kondo’s comments that had book lovers twitchy and defensive. Kondo’s philosophy is about a “less is more” lifestyle and advises the book people to let go of titles that don’t spark joy. Many of Kondo’s critics took issue with her suggestions of downsizing a personal library. The rallying cry of “you can never have too many books” was heard across the Internet.

Content vs Physical Book

Before everyone gets their book jackets in a twist, it is time to let go of the idea that books by themselves are sacred. Is it the actual book or the contents within? A public library exists to help people navigate life by having access to the information they need to make decisions. Sometimes that information is digital, video, audio, or a plain old book. It also is anything from romance fiction to a detailed 1,000 page tome on the life cycle of a fruit fly.