6th Grade Really Kill You cover

Friday Fiction: 6th Grade Can Really Kill You

6th Grade Can Really Kill You
DeClements
1985

Just recently we posted the book called How do you lose those 9th grade blues? with the ultra creepy older boyfriend? This another book in the series, where Elsie is a background player to Helen. Helen has some sort of learning disability and also acts up. She struggles with reading and is called dumb (and worse). Naturally, not all the teachers can see this problem and are just awful and inflexible. A new teacher sees the problem and wants Helen in a special education program. Helen’s mom doesn’t want her in a “special” class due to embarrassment and the stigma.

creative recreation for the mentally retarded

Creative Recreation for Everyone

Creative Recreation for the Mentally Retarded
Amary
1975

I pulled this book from an academic library. The library in question had a large education program and this type of material would be appropriate from an academic perspective. Obviously, the use of “retarded” is inappropriate for a modern publication. Academic collections have different criteria since the use is primarily for scholarship and not for actual consumption. Different use requires different standards for weeding.

Special education students were largely ignored by most public schools until 1975 with the passage of Education for All Handicapped Children Act. The 1970s and 1980s saw huge changes in the laws and education of special needs children. In a public library setting in 2022, the title is disrespectful and smacks of “otherness.”

Dyslexia

Dyslexia

Dyslexia
The Problem of Reading Retardation
Hepworth
1971

Reading and learning to read are fascinating subjects. Holly and I both had undergraduate degrees in education and we have quite a few lively discussions on techniques and child development. We have come a long way in understanding how the developing child learns to read. For the most part, teachers during my time were breaking students into 2 groups: regular and special: there was no room for nuance. Toward the end of the 1980s and in the 1990s, there was real progress in diagnosis and treatment of dyslexia. In addition, accommodation to students with learning issues were very much a part of mainstream schooling.