Knox Cookbook cover

Just No Gelatine!

The Knox Gelatine Cookbook
Rutledge Books, Inc, Knox Gelatine, Inc
1977

Submitter: Just in time for those summer gelatine/Jello salads – who wouldn’t want calico corn relish, creamy cranberry relish, or a zesty seafood appetizer in gelatine? The pictures just make my…mouth water would not be the right phrase. This one is off to the sale cart.

Holly: That corn thing looks disgusting, and I’ll eat just about anything! What was the obsession with gelatine in the 70s?? Especially paired with weird things like fish.

Mary: Jell-o-type products should only be used with fruit cocktail and maybe some whipping cream, if you want to be fancy. Even reading a recipe of one of these “savories” makes me gag.

complete gelatin cookbook

Jello gone wrong

The Complete Gelatin Cookbook
Soares
1978

I was a kid in the 1960s and a Midwesterner. Of course, I love my Jello. It is a staple of my childhood. My mother would take basic cherry flavor and stir in some fruit cocktail from a can. My mom also had an impressive collection of gelatin molds. She could manage a jell-o mold for any occasion.

Now that I have been in the awful library book business for over 10 years, I have a list of standards that are “musts” in every gelatin book:

Criteria met! Now you have some great ideas for your next party!

joy of jello cookbook cover

Gourmet Jell-o Recipes

Joys of Jell-o
General Foods
1960 (est)

I’ll admit it. I have a certain fondness for the old cookbooks, especially the ones with molded food. We have featured quite a few over the years, but I think this one might be a favorite. Nearly every page has a recipe or two that takes creative to a whole new level. You can see the yellow frozen jello loaf below. Looks okay so far. Then we move to the next picture, which has a melon filled with jello. Unfortunately we can’t tell from the black and white picture what flavor of jello was inflicted upon the poor melon, but the recipe suggests lime or red. I shudder to think what flavor is “red,” rather than cherry or strawberry.

But wait, there is more! Now we jump to some savory jello recipes featuring tuna, tomatoes, and cabbage.

salads cookbook

The Big Salad

Salads
Famous Recipes of America
1968

You know I love a cookbook. I don’t actually cook, but I like to “window shop.” Well, straight from the 1960s we have a lovely array of salads. Truth be told, there are not a whole lot of fresh veggies in the recipes, but certainly a lot of interesting shapes. I think I lost my appetite when the word “congealed” was used. Time to pack your knives and go.