thanksgiving inside flap

The “first” Thanksgiving

This little book is really more of a mild tirade about communism and eroding of traditional American ideals. Thanksgiving, in particular. There was an old school history lesson about the pilgrims, settlement of Plymouth, settlement of Jamestown, and President Lincoln’s proclamation of a “day of thanksgiving”.  This recitation of questionable “facts” was an attempt to get at the real controversy: The first Thanksgiving. Naturally, the native Americans are barely secondary players in this story.

In my opinion, this book was a waste of time and paper. I made a cursory attempt to find out if this author had significance beyond this little book. I didn’t find too much about the author other than a couple of other titles about the FBI and the Nixon administration.

Is this worth keeping? For a public library, probably not, unless the collection is super deep. University collections would probably be okay with something like this, depending on collection parameters or research interests.

I will keep to our family traditions of sweatpants, watching the Detroit Lions lose, and eating too much — just like the pilgrims.

76 ways to get organized for christmas

Project Christmas

76 Ways to Get Organized for Christmas
McCullough and Cooper
1982

This book is my kind of nightmare. These women probably start planning the Christmas on December 26. Obviously, from the introduction, you can already tell they have wayyy too much spirit. All that is missing is a Gantt chart and a Powerpoint. Since this book was published prior to many of those project management tools, I guess we can let it go. That alone makes this book a weeder.

holiday cookbook front cover

Holiday Party Menus

Better Homes and Gardens
Holiday Cook Book
1967

Just in time for your holiday cooking! All your special occasion dinners are here. Aside from the standard Thanksgiving and Christmas choices, we have those special foods for simple gatherings, like fancy sandwiches for the entire group. Again, the same loaf, cake-like sandwiches that have appeared on this site more than once or twice. God forbid you make a mistake and think you are biting into a loaf cake.

But wait, there’s more! Try a fruitcake for your next Christmas dinner. My late father was convinced there were only a handful of actual fruitcakes out there. Since no one likes it, it just gets re-gifted into eternity. I don’t think I have even seen a fruitcake since the early 1980s. I remember trying it as a kid because, cake, but nearly choking on the awful taste.

mother's day cover

Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day
Phelan
1965

As a mother (retired), I am totally okay with Mother’s day. (Actually, I am okay with anything that nets me a present or two.) This book gives us an overview of Mother’s day in the US and other countries. Not too bad, but somewhat boring. Then I got to the page about Mother’s Day in Yugoslavia, now Serbia. Evidently, Mom gets tied up by her kids. Really. Before you jump to any weird conclusions, I searched for some verification.

Mother’s Day is celebrated before Christmas as part of the Serbian Orthodox tradition. Mother’s Day is celebrated along with Father’s Day and a Children’s day as part of preparation for Christmas. These holidays are about remembrance and tying the past with the present. (This info is from the Serbian Orthodox Church Diocese of Eastern America and St. Sava Serbian Orthodox Church)

It's time for Thanksgiving

Thankfully Weeded

It’s Time For Thanksgiving
Sechrist and Woolsey
1957

As we start heading into November, I thought I would share this little holiday gem that had not left the shelf in at least 20 years. It might have been longer than that, but the library automated in 1995 so what happened before is anyone’s guess.

This book is actually done by 2 youth librarians and is perfect for anyone wanting to have some themed ideas for a preschool or story time —in the 1950s. It has skits, crafts, poems, and stories that are perfect for a story time or teacher led program. I have a feeling these librarians assembled their best stuff and wrote a book for their fellow youth librarians. This was the 1950s equivalent to a Pinterest board or story time ideas blog.

I think it needs to be retired just on the fact that a few crafts depend on using hatpins.