home office book cover

Home Office Advice

The Home Office Book
Alvarez
1990

Time to get your home office in shape. This book is pretty comprehensive. All the those important decisions on furniture, equipment, and design are helpfully analyzed for convenience.

  • What version of DOS do you need?
  • IBM Clone or the real IBM?
  • Lotus 1-2-3 or VisiCalc?
  • America Online or Prodigy?
  • Cordless phone or phone with a cord?

Of course you should also consider driving or walking to the post office because this book is still a few years from widespread home use of the Internet. Maybe you want to consider getting a fax machine?

I did get a kick out the bygone days of the early 1990s. Clunky computers, dot matrix printers and so many floppy disks are quite a contrast to the technology of today. COVID makes home offices kind of important, so maybe a more up to date book on home offices is required.

internet and computer fads

Old school librarians vs the Internet

Internet and Personal Computing Fads
Bell, Berry, and Van Roekel
2004

This was actually a fun book, from a historical perspective. At the time, this would have been an excellent addition to a public library collection. It’s an accessible book geared to those just stepping into the Internet. Is it relevant for today’s library users? Not really. If they ever do an updated version though, I will buy it for my library.

I remember recently talking to a young professional about the integration of technology in libraries. Most folks were okay with the OPAC since they had been around a long time. The Internet, databases, email, and basic technology support were well beyond some of the old school library types. There was a lot of resistance and discounting of computer based research.

DOS for dummies cover

Get your DOS on!

DOS for Dummies (3rd Edition)
Gookin
1998

For those of you of a certain age, DOS knowledge was essential if you wanted to use those fancy programs like LOTUS 123, Wordstar, and other early office software. Back then everything was command line, and knowledge of DOS around my office made you one of the top geeks. Even though Windows was around in the very early days of personal computers, I don’t think it was a norm in offices until the early to mid 1990s. I remember when I started back to work after having kids, and all of sudden everything was Windows. It took me quite a while to adjust given my previous experience.