Nicotine and Caffeine cover

Nicotine and Caffeine

Focus on Nicotine and Caffeine
Perry
1990

Submitter: It’s a little jarring to see nicotine and caffeine lumped together. Maybe nicotine has decreased in “everyday drug” status since 1990 or maybe I just don’t take caffeine seriously enough, but it seems like an odd pairing. And the “current” stats (from 1989) on smoking are obviously a little of out date by now—down from 29% to about 14% in 2019, per the CDC. The sentence “Like little smokestacks, smokers send out poisonous gasses into the world around them and deep into the world inside them” is pretty great though.

Holly: I think you’re right – smoking is just not as commonplace as it was when this book was published. Caffeine use, however, is still very prevalent. And I agree – we don’t generally lump those two drugs together. Maybe also because there’s no age-related law on purchasing caffeinated foods and beverages. Kids can buy a chocolate candy bar and a Coke; they can’t buy cigarettes.

Drugs and Your Parents cover

Mom and Dad Do Drugs

Drugs and Your Parents
McFarland
1991

Submitter: I might be an alcoholic. When I saw the young women dumping the booze down the drain my heart sank. “Not the good stuff!”Joking aside, this book is pretty out of date. A drug book from 1991 won’t have any of today’s designer drugs that are ravaging America.

Holly: Is every picture in this book a hair-in-the-face profile shot? Except, that is, for the lady with the banana clip. I haven’t seen one of those in a few decades! They all seem to have shadows, too. The photography seems amateur and dated. Parents who are addicts are no joke, but this book makes me laugh.