Project Christmas

76 ways to get organized for christmas

76 Ways to Get Organized for Christmas
McCullough and Cooper
1982

This book is my kind of nightmare. These women probably start planning Christmas on December 26. Obviously, from the introduction, you can already tell they have wayyy too much spirit. All that is missing is a Gantt chart and a Powerpoint. Since this book was published prior to many of those project management tools, I guess we can let it go. That alone makes this book a weeder.

I do have a snarky attitude both at work and at home. (Many years ago, I wrote this piece on “forced fun” for the holidays. Much of it is still true.) I blame it on the day we had repatriated from the UK right before the holidays, and someone commented that we should rush and get our house decorations going, since it was already past Thanksgiving. We had just moved in. I still had jet lag. The last thing I wanted to do was put up Christmas lights.

However, if you are the kind of person who wants to turn Christmas up to 11, this book was for you…in 1982. There are lots of holiday ideas in crafts, cooking, and entertaining. Heck, we can even throw in a computer book so you can be up on the tech.

Mary

5 comments

  1. Wow. I never knew Christmas was so much work and that I should answer a quiz afterward. And here I was, naively just decorating and baking and having fun doing so. I’m a Christmas slacker and never knew it!

  2. Fun fact! This was the actual inspiration for The Nightmare Before Christmas.

    (not really, but this really does sound like a friggin nightmare to me!)

  3. I already “set realistic goals and schedules”. I put up a small fake tree and buy gifts off people’s Amazon Wish Lists, stock up on (store-bought) cookies, and check to see when the Yule Log is on TV. Done.

    That other stuff is just too much.

    Chapter 6 is just stupid. Sure, the kids really want to spend Christmas break organizing their sock drawers.

    Remember to dispose of your real dead conifer in an ecological way nowadays — my city collects them in a set week and composts them. Looks like in 1982 you just put it outside to rot?

  4. So much of this sounds like the “advice” given in the Man Who Has It All account on Twitter – by which I mean that this comes across as a parody rather than the earnest spirit in which it was meant.
    Props for the part about teaching the kids to write thank-you notes, though.

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