growing up cover

Growing Up

Growing Up
de Schweinitz
1956 3rd Edition (Original Copyright: 1928)

This is another find in my Swedish Death Cleaning Project

Yes, it has been a while since I posted a selection from my Swedish death cleaning project. I did manage to clear out a bunch of stuff and recycled or donated a good chunk of the personal library. However, since we are getting carpet installed in this room and need to move the furniture around, this little gem was parked behind some stuff and fell out when we were packing stuff up.

This book is geared to children. From the text and illustrations it seems a bit much for the younger crowd, so maybe they are thinking upper elementary. It’s basic sperm meets egg. The author has some animal metaphors for how this sperm and egg thing work. We have some cameos by cows, horses, sheep, and trout. There is also an illustration of birth.

Computers in Society cover

The Computer Revolution

Computers in Society
7th Ed.
Schellenberg
1998

Submitter: Just when you think you have cleared out every out-of-date tech book in your collection, one shows up to flaunt its uselessness. Computer book from the last century? Off to the recycle bin.

Holly: I hate it when that happens! I’m sure half the URLs listed in the second image below don’t exist anymore (although I didn’t test them). I also like how the introduction talks about the “computer or information revolution” when we’re a few revolutions beyond that.

overnight cinderella cover

Friday Fiction: Overnight Cinderella

Overnight Cinderella
Garbera
2001

I usually grab any title that features a librarian so I am ready for our library themed posts for National Library Week. I was going to feature this one, but the librarian part of our heroine’s life was barely there. Evidently, our heroine, Cami, traded in her research librarian cardigan for a more glamorous job in event planning.

I think the author used librarian as a metaphor for virginal and shy. (Come to think of it, I don’t know too many librarians that give off the virginal and shy vibe. But I digress.) Anyway, she meets Duke, the corporate suit in charge of security for Pryce Enterprises. Of course Duke and Cami have to work together due to security issues for a big gala that Pryce was hosting.

Finger Frolics cover

Finger Frolics

Finger Frolics: Fingerplays for Young Children
Cromwell
1983

Submitter: [This] title caught my eye on a list of books that have not circulated in 10+ years. Funny title aside, if there is one thing I know about children’s books, it’s that young’uns don’t take kindly to incorrect depictions of dinosaurs. Trust me!

Holly: Points for diverse characters on the cover. Otherwise, this is full of words and phrases kids don’t generally understand or use (what does “nick, nick, nick new” even mean?? See last image below.) The images are boring too. The fingerplays themselves might not be too bad for seasoned performers, but I’m not sure they’re great choices for “young children” as the title implies.

Menopause cover

Change of Life

Menopause: A Woman Doctor’s Guide: Essential Facts and Up-to-the-Minute Information for a Woman’s Change of Life
Jovanovic and LeVert
2001

Submitter: I don’t think it’s hard to say, but some need to hear it – 20 year old medical books that are yellow and crumbling can be dumped. Get something more up-to-date people! Just when you think you have gotten rid of them all, you find another one.

Holly: As a 47-year-old woman staring down the barrel of this era of life, when I start looking for information on this topic, I’m going to need it to be very, very current. Do me, and millions of other middle-aged women, a favor and update your women’s health collections!

Guide to Evaluation of Library Collections cover

National Library Week Special-Professional Collection

Guide to the Evaluation of Library Collections
Collection Management and Development Guides
No. 2
Lockett, ed.
1989

This 1989 publication was sitting in a professional collection as of this writing. I would be surprised if anyone had even looked at this book in the last 20 years.

It is written in an organized format, like an outline. Easy for referencing, but boring in the way it looks. Obviously this one is much better. (Even though those lazy authors haven’t updated it for a new edition.)

You can already guess this one is long past it’s prime.

Time to weed the professional collection people!

Happy National Library Week

Libraries cover

National Library Week-Another book for the kids

Today’s National Library Week choice is this 1964 book about libraries that was still in circulation as of this writing. I was impressed that it actually didn’t look worse. Other than the yellowing pages, it is in pretty good shape. The text isn’t too bad, but it is rather dense for the kids. To a kid in 2021, this is really not helpful.

As a librarian, I have some comments. The lady on the in the illustration about the Mazarin Library really shouldn’t be leaning on the display like that. My first impression was that she was sleeping. In the final illustration of the “modern” library, some of the card catalog drawers are not closed properly. Is it too much to ask that people shut the drawers (gently, of course) when they are finished using the catalog? Also the card catalog seems to be a bit small and inconveniently placed for use. Finally, where are the golf pencils and scraps of paper? I’m getting a twitch looking at these illustrations.