Ouch! cover

Ouch!

Ouch! A Book About Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes
Berger
1991

Submitter: The information in this book is fine, but it’s pretty visually dated and hasn’t been checked out in about 10 years. Mostly I’m chuckling over the extremely dramatic, unrealistic drawings of blood spurting from assorted wounds. Be sure to check out the images of the interior pages for that.

Holly: Not to mention the advanced vocabulary, like “fibrin” and “platelets.”

United Nations Conspiracy title page

UN Conspiracy

The United Nations Conspiracy
Lee
1981

Submitter: I guess this book was purchased in the interest of “balance” for our academic library. In 1981, apparently, it was okay to pretend that whackadoodle conspiracy theories represented an alternative point of view. I’m glad the predictions of enslavement to a One World Government have yet to come true, and that the godless commies have not prevailed, despite the “brickbats coming thick and heavy” to John Wayne, of all people. John Wayne, “far removed from Hollywood’s typical subversion and perversion as you can get!” The nerve!

work should be fun!!

It’s Labor Day Weekend! Start off with some books about work.

Labor Day (Monday, September 6, 2021) is one of my favorite 3 day weekend holidays. For me, it is the unofficial end of summer. Back when I was in youth services, I felt like I had maybe 15 minutes of a break in late August before I started all over with summer reading planning for the next year and getting ready for the next round of students. The Labor Day weekend was almost sacred in my book.

To celebrate Labor day, I have selected a few “labor” themed posts. To add on this, we would like to give a shout out to the Reuther archives. Just about everyone back in our day made a trip to the Walter P. Reuther Library/Archives as part of the intro to libraries course. The Reuther archives is the largest collection of labor archives in North America. If you are a history nerd, take a peak at some of the exhibits available.

Happy Labor Day weekend everyone!

The Black Death cover

The Black Death

The Black Death
Day
1989

Submitter: Other than the cover (is that E.T. wielding the scythe of death? Why is he not wearing any clothes? Why is the dead man on the ground smiling?), this book is actually not that bad, just really old. Old enough to be concerned that “AIDS may soon become as damaging as the plague once was.” The pages are yellowed, the illustration style is pretty dated, and there are plenty of good newer books on the topic available. At 32 years old, this book has had a full life.

Holly: All the people in all the pictures in this book look like Zombies.

feminine leadership book cover

When the Ladies Run the Show

Feminine Leadership
or How to Succeed in Business Without Being One of the Boys
Loden
1985

The basic theme of this book is that women can use feminine traits to succeed in leadership roles. The ladies are evidently really good at feelings and can be more intuitive leaders than the guys. The 70s and 80s were loaded with this kind of literature as women started entering professions previously off limits. I was one of those who would suck these books up like they were water. Most of the time, these books were little help in navigating a career in the real world. It’s not like senior management grabbed on to these concepts and welcomed women with open arms.

Neither Proof nor Trace for the Holocaust cover

Holocaust Handbook

Deliveries of Coke, Wood and Zyklon B to Auschwitz—Neither Proof Nor Trace for the Holocaust
Holocaust Handbooks, Volume 40
Mattogno
2021

Submitter: As a collection development librarian who receives email suggestions, you never know what you’ll find when you open a request. We received this eBook as an unwanted donation this week. It’s a Holocaust denying book that is totally crazy and full of inaccurate information. I am hoping the other 39 volumes are not on their way!

Holly: I can’t get past the series title: Holocaust Handbooks.

Feminine Fix-it Handbook title page

Ladies with Tools

The Feminine Fix-it Handbooks
Ward
1972

I’m actually kind of a fan of this book. Aside from the dated advice, it is actually a pretty good book. It’s written without any cutesy condescending language. I am also a big fan of the vocabulary/definition appendix in this book. Jargon is often an extra layer of complication when someone is learning a new skill. My nerd librarian self loves good footnotes, indexes, etc. The author/publishers recognize that the use and organization of the information is also critical. Regardless of gender, this is a pretty decent book.