Playboy Bunny Cake Pan

Awful Cake Pans

Wilton Playboy Bunny Cake Pan

Submitter: A lot of libraries allow you to take out cake pans for all those people who want to try out a fun new idea for their birthday cakes. Most pans are fine, what kid wouldn’t want a fire truck or a dog shaped cake at their party? But I can see this pan sitting lonely on the shelf, while the library’s hundred other cake pans are circulated through. Why? Because it’s the Playboy Bunny Cake Pan. Yes, a cake pan in the shape of the Playboy bunny, that “celebrated symbol most men know and love! It’s bound to liven up birthdays, bachelor parties, Father’s Day and more.” If it wasn’t enough to just get the pan, there’s also a pdf that shares the decoration instructions and the back of the label with its 2 fun decorating ideas; one of which is Christmas themed. Since nothing says Merry Christmas like the Playboy Bunny wearing a cheery Christmas bow tie. Looking at the pictures, it’s clear that only people with lots of time on their hands will follow the instructions. I can’t see anyone checking this pan out anytime soon.

HollyThis is funny! It isn’t just any bunny cake; the Playboy Bunny has a very distinctive shape. It is recognizable by most adults. I’d totally check this out (but, then, I have the sense of humor of a 12-year-old boy).

Cookin with Crisco cover

Vintage Cookbooks: The ALB Home Edition

Jackie Olden’s Cookin’ With Crisco Oil
Olden
1986

Submitter: Mom and I both collect and use vintage cook books. Great for home libraries, not for public ones. I often snatch up old ones that have been discarded from libraries at book sales. […] And we do use them, though sometimes we alter the recipes because some of the stuff mentioned doesn’t exist anymore. Or to personalize them. Just recently I used her really old Pillsbury cookbook to make some bread, then added in my own twist – shredded cheese, olive oil, garlic salt, dried parsley, dried basil, and diced oil packed sundried tomatoes. So old recipe books, great for personal libraries, terrible for public ones! (But if any library wants to send me their old recipe books…. LOL)

Holly: I like vintage cookbooks too! I love those old church fundraisers with the spiral bindings (a.k.a. the library kiss of death, and you know there will be about a hundred of them waiting in your donation piles, which are accumulating on your libraries’ front porches while you’re away). They always use ingredients like “oleo” and suggest “a small pinch” as a measurement.

culinary crafting

Food Craft

Culinary Crafting
The Art of Garnishing and Decorating Food
1976

For the foodies out there here is a nice book on how to decorate your food. The illustrations aren’t much to look at, and hardly make the food look appetizing. Photographs would be a better choice, even in the 1970s. Beyond the book design, the recipes are just okay and nothing particularly impressive. The decorations range from a watermelon bowl to a piece of pineapple on top of a ham. You can even go wild and add a maraschino cherry. It’s all very underwhelming.

Mary

microwave cookbook

Futuristic Cooking with a Microwave

The New Revised
General Electric
Microwave Guide & Cookbook
1977

My family jumped into the crazy cutting edge world of microwaves around the time this book was published. The pitch was always about how you could defrost or prepare food in just seconds, sometimes minutes. I personally remember microwaving hot dogs to watch them completely curl up.

Nothing my mother or myself were able to make anything that resembled the pictures in microwave cookbooks. I am convinced these were all faked. The meat in particular always had a lovely grey color. The texture was also just awful. It should have been nicknamed Soylent Green.

Mary

Low-Calorie Desserts cover

Low-Calorie Desserts

Low-Calorie Desserts
Better Homes and Gardens
1972

Submitter: There are some reasonable recipes here, but the whole thing looks really dated.

Holly: I’m all for dessert less than 150 calories, and submitter is right – there are some tasty-sounding treats here. The photography is very 1970s, though. Food blogs today have such gorgeous images; this can’t hold a candle to what you see online today.