myspace safety

Are you a friend of Tom?

MySpace Safety
51 Tips For Teens and Parents
Farnham and Farnham
2006

It’s been a while since I came across a MySpace book in the wild. I have a feeling I am probably the first one to check this book out in over a decade. Aside from the less than inspiring cover, this book probably did an adequate job explaining the basic security and privacy concerns. Why it is still hanging out in a public library collection is beyond me. This is one of those obvious weeds. Even if your particular service population is all about MySpace, I doubt this book from 2006 is any help.

I did take a peek at MySpace and it doesn’t even resemble the MySpace of 2006. The content now focuses on the entertainment industry. I tried searching for my old account, but I think it is gone to time. Also, I can’t remember what I did with mine. I only made an account to show people how to set up an account. Oh well. I guess I can’t call my friend Tom anymore.

Creative Fingerplays cover

Fingerplays for the Emotionally Disturbed

Creative Fingerplays and Action Rhymes: An Index and Guide to Their use
Defty
1992

Submitter: I am a newly-hired youth services librarian for a public library branch that had been without a children’s librarian for nearly 3 years. While evaluating my library’s professional development collection, I came across [this book]. Most of the information in this book is fairly standard for the subject: chapters cover developmental milestones for various ages, suggested fingerplays and rhymes, and some sample craft ideas. All of these fingerplays themselves are now nicely organized and demonstrated on sites such as Jbrary. And since 1992, a number of excellent trainings like Supercharged Storytimes have been developed and made available for youth services librarians. This 30-year-old book, therefore, was unlikely to get much use at my branch. Regardless, I felt the need to browse the book and discovered the sample page I’m including here on serving “mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed children.” Um, we don’t use those terms anymore, and I’m kind of surprised they were still being used in 1992! Even my colleague at my branch who hates the idea of weeding anything agreed this title had to go.

Holly: Sometimes it’s easy to miss books like these, that still have some value. I’m sure the actual fingerplays are mostly fine. It’s these hidden sections, like the one you submitted, that can be overlooked. You can always photocopy the pieces you can still use and recycle the rest.

camping manual cover

Camp for Christian Girls

Camping Manual – Camping Along Missions Trails
Tully
1970

Initially, I was unclear who the intended audience was for this book. There is actually very little camping info aside from a few activities. This book is for church groups or others looking to set up a Christian themed girls camp. Fair enough. I thought it would be more comprehensive with curriculum and schedules, but it is pretty light on the details. We have a few crafts and activities, but none of the hardcore skills that were mentioned in the introduction. A good chunk is devoted to finding the right staff. They even have a sample application!

Again, the info is light. While they insist on giving lots of training to camp counselors (good idea!), there isn’t much on HOW to do it. It reads more like a nice outline and lacks any of the detail that matters. I guess this is what the phrase “God is in the details” means.

When I Was Young I Loved School cover

Dropping Out-Hanging In

When I was Young I Loved School: Dropping Out and Hanging In
By Children’s Express
Edited by Sheffield and Frankel
1988

Submitter: What is this book, even?! Just a compendium of conversations between teenage editors of Children’s Express and randomly selected teens about dropping out. Even in 1988, did “eavesdropping” on kids’ conversations tell us much about why kids drop out? And did teens in 1988 talk in complete sentences with proper grammar and punctuation, as rendered here?

Social Psychology of Education cover

Trippy Textbook

Social Psychology of Education
Guskin
1970

Submitter: The groovy 1970s cover caught my eye on the weeding cart! But the shabby condition and outdated content meant it had to go. See the index for Outdated Term for People of Color as well as Outdated Term for People with Intellectual Disabilities.

Holly: It’s definitely outdated! Such an odd cover, too. It breathes some life into a serious academic tome. But, the Guskins (unclear if they’re related) are well-respected scholars and the book was positively reviewed (50 years ago). It’s clearly time to weed it now for all but the most historically-centered collections.

Dinosaurs

Evil Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs
The Bible, Barney, and Beyond
Phillips
1994

Phillips is an author of another book on this site, Saturday Morning Mind Control, in which the author asserts that Saturday morning cartoons are the gateway to evil. This book is more of the same. Dinosaurs, in particular Barney and Jurassic Park, are dissected for the apparent evil that lurks within these shows. He seems to have gathered that a big purple dinosaur with an annoying song about love is anti-Christian. As a mother of kids in the early 1990s, Barney wasn’t my favorite either, but I hardly would call him evil.

Based on the themes of his books, this guy is a giant killjoy. As one 7 year-old told me, “the library always needs more dinosaur books.” Amen, kid.

Spelling Reform cover

Spelling Reform

Spelling Reform: A New Approach
Lindgren
1969

Submitter: I found this Australian spelling reform book in an American Public Library. The problematic cover notwithstanding, this book discusses the author’s unique approach to teaching spelling, by removing some vowels. There is a wiki page all about this – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SR1

Holly: Seems like an odd choice for an American public library for sure. That cover is an absolute abomination! White man’s magic?? The actual spelling reform idea is interesting, though – said becomes sed, ready becomes redy, heifer becomes hefer, friend becomes frend…spelling in English would be a lot easier to both learn and teach this way! The author would have to give up favourite for favorit, though.