analyzing library collection use with Excel

NLW Special: Excel for Collections

Analyzing Library Collection Use With Excel
Greiner and Cooper
2007

This is my personal copy that I have had over 10 years. It is my little bible for all things collection and Excel. Yes, it is out of date, but statistics and goals are not. I am also an average user of Excel and appreciated the advice setting up some of my worksheets. You don’t have to be an expert Excel user to get the benefit of this book.

Excel has a lot more features now and I really would like another library focused Excel manual geared to the average user. Simple sorts and functions can yield lots of information about your collection.

Librarian's Quick Guide to Internet Resources cover

NLW 2022: Internet Resources circa 2001

Librarian’s Quick Guide to Internet Resources
2nd Edition
Semenza
2001

Since it is National Library Week, Holly and I usually feature some titles related to libraries and or librarians. Since both of us have been in library work from what seems like the beginning of time, this book was literally a blast from the past. I know that in 2001 both Holly and I would have embraced this book as a bible to the Internet.

Back in the day we constantly curated pathfinders/reference guides for our own use at the reference desk. At the time, Google was only a few years old and Web 2.0 wasn’t a thing. There was also a lot of resistance in the profession to embrace technology. The more tech motivated librarians at the time would have loved this book for it’s practical ready reference sources and it’s logical organization.

librarian's guide to word perfect

WordPerfect 5.0 for the Savvy Librarian

Librarian’s Guide to WordPerfect
LaPier
1989

I know many of you are looking for some opportunities for continuing education. May I suggest the world of word processing? This timely topic is ripe for a librarian wanting to get ahead of all the new technology.

Over and over, Holly and I have seen some pathetic professional collections out there. They are often ignored and unused. This year, I decided to just integrate them into our regular circulating collection. This opens them up to more use and hopefully our staff will be able to see it regularly. Also, since it is on the regular shelf in the 000s, I know I will be better able to keep an eye on this collection.

Digital Libraries cover

Digital Libraries

Digital libraries
Balasubramanian
2021

Submitter: I was excited to see this book at my local public library. I always like learning more about what other libraries are doing in the way of digital libraries. This book is a joke! Just take a look at the scanning section. Not to mention the pixelated HTML screenshots. Sad…

Holly: Apparently Ess Ess Publications is a publisher of library science materials in India. I don’t know where Submitter’s library is located, and I don’t know how useful this would be to libraries in India. I was surprised at the publication date, though, and those screen shots on the example pages (below) are impossible to read. Not your best choice on the subject here in the U.S.!

Guide to Evaluation of Library Collections cover

National Library Week Special-Professional Collection

Guide to the Evaluation of Library Collections
Collection Management and Development Guides
No. 2
Lockett, ed.
1989

This 1989 publication was sitting in a professional collection as of this writing. I would be surprised if anyone had even looked at this book in the last 20 years.

It is written in an organized format, like an outline. Easy for referencing, but boring in the way it looks. Obviously this one is much better. (Even though those lazy authors haven’t updated it for a new edition.)

You can already guess this one is long past it’s prime.

Time to weed the professional collection people!

Happy National Library Week

Libraries cover

National Library Week-Another book for the kids

Today’s National Library Week choice is this 1964 book about libraries that was still in circulation as of this writing. I was impressed that it actually didn’t look worse. Other than the yellowing pages, it is in pretty good shape. The text isn’t too bad, but it is rather dense for the kids. To a kid in 2021, this is really not helpful.

As a librarian, I have some comments. The lady on the in the illustration about the Mazarin Library really shouldn’t be leaning on the display like that. My first impression was that she was sleeping. In the final illustration of the “modern” library, some of the card catalog drawers are not closed properly. Is it too much to ask that people shut the drawers (gently, of course) when they are finished using the catalog? Also the card catalog seems to be a bit small and inconveniently placed for use. Finally, where are the golf pencils and scraps of paper? I’m getting a twitch looking at these illustrations.

libraries and how to use them

NLW-Libraries and how they work

Libraries and How to Use Them
Hardendorff
1979

Another library book about libraries. Although geared to kids, it is pretty text heavy and the illustrations are just okay. As much as I could appreciate some definitions of library jargon, this book probably has more depth in some pages than a library science textbook. All in all, it isn’t the worst, but it is woefully dated.

I also kept looking at the cover and thinking it was some kind of pattern, like a stained glass window. It took me a while to realize that the groovy cover really was a bunch of books on a shelf. In 1979, this book is decent but in 2021. Somebody should weed this and submit it as supplemental reading for an intro to library science course.