Cherokee Words

Word Nerds

Cherokee Language With Pictures
Chiltoskey
1972

Submitter: I was in the last part of the 400s, where people go to learn to speak another language and found these three books. The good news – they were no longer in the catalogue. Meaning at some point they either were not transferred over when we switched from Dynix to Sirsi, were transferred but then marked missing and stayed that way in the system until auto-discarded, or were discarded and someone forgot to black out the labels. The bad news is they were still on our shelves as of January 21st, 2021!

What's What cover

What’s What

What’s What: A Visual Glossary of the Physical World
Bragonier, Jr. and Fisher
1981

Submitter: I love visual dictionaries and this one is charming. Even though the pictures are all black and white, they are clear and instructive. However, in the age of Google image searching, no one is looking for a book to help them visualize, especially not college students! And things like Vehicles and Audiovisual Communication have changed a LOT since 1981! And who knows, maybe readers of the future will wonder what a book used to look like, or a letter on paper. But this book is no good to our readers here and now.

Great Dinosaur Mystery cover

Dinosaurs in the Garden of Eden

The Great Dinosaur Mystery and the Bible
Taylor
1989

Submitter: Earlier this year while we were only doing curbside service, a patron called and asked for dinosaur books for her kids. Somehow I had missed this gem while weeding the J-nonfiction, and I was so glad that I found it before anyone else did. I deleted it before I looked to see how many circs (if any) it had- it hadn’t circulated at all since I got here a year and a half ago. My favorite picture is the one with the guy (Adam?) lovingly petting the little Parasaurolophus.

ADA Guide to Insulin and Type 2 Diabetes

Dibetus

American Diabetes Association Guide to Insulin and Type 2 Diabetes
McCarren
2007

Submitter: Why do I hear Wilford Brimley’s voice “Diabetes” when I look at this book.  We received this book as a donation last week. It’s a 13 year old book on Diabetes. We won’t keep a medical book longer than 5 years at this library – so this went straight to the weed pile. 13 years in any medical field feels like light years in achievements.

Holly: Dear patrons, Thank you for thinking of the library with your donation. Our need for materials is great.

But not this great.

Secret Power of the Pyramids cover

More Pyramid Power

The Secret Power of the Pyramid
Akins
1980

Submitter: Yes, the hit author of ESP: Your Psychic Powers and How to Test Them is back to tell you the truth about pyramids, who built them, and their mysterious powers.

Any 40-year-old book that hasn’t been checked out since well before any of my students were even born deserves to be weeded, but this “non-fiction” book is a prime example of pseudoscience. It tells the reader about the “true” history of pyramids and how they were really built by either the gods, aliens, or Atlanteans. Certainly not a bunch of “primitive people” from Africa, don’t be ridiculous!

Offbeat Careers cover

Offbeat Careers

Offbeat Careers: The Directory of Unusual Work
Sacharow
1988

Submitter: Well, Al and I have very different opinions about what constitutes “offbeat.” Mainly things that aren’t actually careers, maybe not even jobs. Miss America? Game Show Contestant? Dated and just… odd. Mary may be interested in at least one of the careers listed! LOL!

All career books need careful curation, but this one was an easy weed!

Story of Weather cover

How’s the weather up there?

The Story of Weather
Giles
1990

Submitter: It is mostly a moderately interesting book going through various weather phenomena, different climates and biomes, and some notable events in weather history. The fact that it is 30 years old is reason enough to weed it, but the real fun is in the final chapter: “Future Climate.”

Here, the book tries to spin climate change as a good thing, speculating that the British “perpetual moaning about weather may become a thing of the past” as the weather slowly “becomes similar to … the south-west of France.”