Hoarding is not collection development

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Waxing poetic

wax

Wax in our World
Russell
1966

Wax as a topic for a medium public library juvenile nonfiction section has got to be one of the oddest ideas ever.  Just so you all know, I have no bias against the subject of wax.  Hey, wax as a part of a craft or in candle making, I would be all over that.  Waxing as hair removal, I might be interested in that for my collection.  (Okay, I might have to be sold on that idea.   Can you imagine the illustrations when they get to discussing the bikini line?)  What makes me laugh is the idea that somewhere a publisher was in a meeting saying  “I think the kids are looking for a good book on wax”.

Mary

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16 Responses to Waxing poetic

  • There are some kids with pretty odd interests. I guess if this never circulates and you need the space you should weed it, but otherwise I don’t see what’s so bad about this title.

  • I will no longer frequent a site that harbours such anti-waxist hatred!

  • This is one of many books I’ve seen here, as well as in my own library, that makes me wonder what was going through the librarian’s head when she decided to buy this book. There’s nothing wrong with it at all; I just wonder what the inspiration was.

  • Definitely does NOT belong in the juvenile section.

  • Kids loved the wax back in the 70’s. It was the in thing.

  • Does include a section on ear wax and its mitigation?

  • Sounds like a title purchased in anticipation of some awful school craft project. Wax on, wax off, Daniel-san!

  • It’s probably one of a set about natural materials or resources or some such thing. I never get why librarians hold on to this stuff. If a book is a primary source or has historical significance send it on to some library that specializes. This stuff is just wasting space in a library trying to serve young people. For the history of wax, if anyone would want such a thing, they can Google.

  • I don’t know, in the quest for a comprehensive collection librarians sometimes go to awesome extremes. I had a collection request for a title on making plastic out of petrol. for children, I wondered if this was supposed to be a “how-to” book?

  • I think someone should speak up for the wax book. Wax is a natural product, and on the cover there’s an implied focus on anthropology. What’s wrong with “green” crafting? The President’s half sister is doing a big thing at the White House this week on batik. The illustration on the cover is well done and is actually reminiscent of the book illustration work a certain “Andrew Warhol” did before he moved on to better things. Is the book out of date? I’d like to read it myself.

  • I suppose some kid must’ve needed it at one point for a science project. When their teacher said they couldn’t do the one about coffee and which brand made you the most awake because “Experimenting on your parents is wrong.”

  • Strikes me as not being very far away from the extremely popular and current books on topics such as the history of salt.

  • What, do you want children to learn about wax on the street?

  • Am I the only one who thinks the subject itself is kind of neat? Maybe a bit outdated, but I’m sure there there are curious minds out there who’d learn something from this.

  • I also find the subject interesting. This may qualify as “niche” but that does not mean “without value”. Along with an updated version of some sort, this would be a nice comparison read. I love an eclectic library! We can do both! 🙂