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Type Up Your Personal Problems

College Typewriting with Personal Problems
Lessenberry
1941

Submitter: I have a book we just recently weeded at [a university library] that I think you’ll like. The “with personal problems” is what first cracked me up. I couldn’t help thinking, “No thanks, I have enough already.” Aside from the humorous nature of the title, I’m not sure why we were still holding onto a book on typewriting, let along one that is over seven decades old. We’re an academic library, but I can assure you the school’s mission does not include the collecting of vintage textbooks.

Holly: Oh, brother. (Ha! See what I did there? Actually, this book was published back when Brother made sewing machines, not typewriters.) Books about typing are great for libraries of various types, but for the love of Smith Corona, please update them!

Type ‘Em If You’ve Got ‘Em:

How Quaint!

Type This Up!

Typewriter Town

8 Responses to Type Up Your Personal Problems

  • If its like the one I used in school, its not completely useless with a computer. The idea was you set it up next to your keyboard, then learned to touch type by copying the bits of text while not looking at the keyboard.

    How effective it ever was is open to question. I know where all the letters are, but I don’t actually touch type and I, gasp, look back and forth while copying something.

  • Curiosity overwhelms me. I have to ask – what personal problems with typing were they writing about?

  • Seems like this would still be useful for teaching QWERTY keyboarding.

  • I am so disappointed that you did not show any of the personal problems parts!

  • I can only think of one personal problem that I have in typing. It’s double-spacing after a period. Because those of us who learned with books like this tend to still hit the space bar twice. Still, I refuse to be considered a fuddy-duddy.

  • While I found the personal problems part funny too, my guess is it that it meant open-ended prompts/exercises for the typist to practice with.

  • My guess is “problem” as in an arithmetic problem: or assignments, in other words. So this textbook would cover both business and personal correspondence.