Hoarding is not collection development
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Best Book Review Blogs” style=

The Book Blogger Awards 2017

technology

Y2K

Time Bomb 2000: What the Year 2000 Computer Crisis Means to You!
Yourdon
1998

Thank you, submitter, for another look at Y2K.  We had another Y2K submission a while back.  Read all about it here!

This was favorably reviewed by Library Journal, and was probably a useful book in 1998 and 1999.  Is it still on library shelves for historical purposes?  I found lots of articles in my library’s databases about Y2K, so my patrons are not at a loss for information about how it all went down, should they be interested.  If you have space, there’s nothing wrong with keeping one or two of these, I guess, but if you don’t have space it’s an easy choice for weeding.  Let the internet and online databases offer this kind of information.

I do love the seriousness of the title: “Time Bomb!”  At the time, that’s what it seemed like: a ticking time bomb.  If it wasn’t figured out in time, the whole infrastructure of the world would have exploded.  Or so they say. I happen to know that Mary filled her bathtub with water on New Year’s Eve 1999, “just in case.”

Holly

More Interwebs for Beginners

Wading the World Wide Web : Internet activities for beginners
Kyker
1998

Submitter: Ah, the ever popular technology choice: a book on the World Wide Web that’s more than a decade old! How many teachers are going to want a book that doesn’t mention Google, but includes detailed information on how a modem works?

Holly: Good grief.  There is no end to old computer books.  Yes, commenters, we know you love them.  Please do buy them in the book sale, yard sales, and eBay.  I’ll stand by the idea that they don’t belong in public libraries.

Computer Fun

Science Projects with Computers
Schulman, et. al.
1985

This book is so old that the computer on the cover doesn’t have a mouse. I believe that girl’s finger is poised over one of the function keys!  Remember when bolding, underlining, etc. were achieved by some combination of <alt>, <ctrl>, <shift>, and a function key?  They made keyboard overlay guides out of cardboard so you could remember the combinations.  This book will win you no blue ribbons at the science fair, trust me.

Holly