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puppets

Jesus loves puppets

puppets go to church

Puppets Go To Church
Perry and Perry
1975

Puppets, clowns, and mimes are my personal trifecta of evil. However, when one is in charge of collection development at a library, it is essential to set aside one’s personal issues with respect to puppets, mimes, and clowns and recognize that others love this stuff. Personally, since these puppets are on a mission from God, I am even more disturbed. But I digress.

This is less about puppet craft and more about performance and integrating Gospel themes into modern lessons. This would be a decent choice for some Christian school and church libraries if it were the mid to late 1970s. The scripts seem a bit dated and in one skit there is a reference to being spanked by someone’s mother, which would make it questionable for some libraries.

Mary

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More Puppet Madness

Puppet Making coverPuppet-Making
Schneebeli-Morrell
1994

Submitter: The puppets in this book are the stuff of nightmares. The one positive thing I can say is that the directions and illustrations are clear and easy to follow, but this book is well overdue for an update.

Holly: Ohhhh, puppets. Our readers have strong feelings about them. Honestly, I’ve seen worse, but this is hanging out in a youth craft collection, so an update would be great. 1994 doesn’t seem so awfully long ago, but it was 23 years ago as of this writing. That’s a generation of people, so the kids it was purchased for are now bringing their kids to the library. That “Crown Prince” puppet, pictured below, looks like King Friday! Cute.

Also, what’s the guy with the arrow on the horse doing on the cover? That doesn’t seem to match the puppet theme.

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Hand and Rod Puppets

Hand and Rod Puppets coverHand and Rod Puppets: A Handbook of Technique
Fettig
translated by Susanne Forster
1973

Submitter: This was in the children’s section. I hate to say “just look at it” but… yeah. It’s ugly as sin, it’s pointless, and I’m pretty sure that if it could talk, it would tell me stories about paying ten cents for ice cream cones. I don’t doubt Mr. Fettig’s technique, but I do doubt any kid is gonna walk in and ask about dirty, old books about creepy puppets. I am going to keep it for my personal collection, though. I feel sorry for it. ‘Twas part of a public library’s collection.

Holly: If you type “making puppets” into Amazon, there are all kinds of glossy, full-color books for under $20. I can’t imagine why there are so many of these old black and white puppet books from the 1970s lingering on library shelves. The art and craft of puppet making is still relevant, and should not be lost forever, but keeping books from the 1970s on the subject doesn’t entice anyone to want to learn about it. For the love of Dewey, update!

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