Hoarding is not collection development
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picture books

May The Fourth Be With You

star wars kids book with record

Star Wars
20th Century-Fox Film Corp.
1979

In honor Star Wars Day, here are a couple of picture books. (One with an ACTUAL RECORD!) As a fan of the original trilogy, I do reject the second book, since Jar Jar Binks is the worst (and then I quit paying attention to the rest of the series.)

Break out your light sabers and become one with the force,

Mary

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The Skunk and His Junk

The Skunk and His Junk coverThe Skunk and His Junk
Scheunemann
2006

Submitter: I might be an adult, but when I find books like this I turn into a middle schooler. Really, publishers ought to run all of their books by a group of 12-year-olds. It would save everyone a lot of time and trouble

Holly: <Snort!> Ok, ok. There’s nothing really wrong with this book. It’s fine for a library collection. I’m not personally a fan of this art style – half-drawn, half real-life image. But, the rhymes are clever and it’s colorful. It’s fun to read about your junk. (Does anyone remember the Eddie Murphy song “Boogie in Your Butt”? It is now playing on a loop in my head. You’re welcome.)

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Mommy and Daddy Are Divorced

mommy and daddy are divorced

 

Mommy and Daddy are Divorced
Perry and Lynch
1985

Submitter: We are a faculty of education library, and have lots of picture books on how teachers can help kids deal with various difficult topics. We are doing inventory and I took the opportunity to weed this gem. The terrible black and white photographs caught my eye first.  It looks like the authors just took their own home photos and stuck them onto pages with some text. The picture on the last page is the best one – so dark and blurry you can hardly make the figures out. While the subject of divorce is an important one, a lot has changed since 1985. Main character Ned would be over 30 by now. Surely we can find a more up to date book on the subject! It has been in our library for 20 years and never once circulated, so it was time to say goodbye to Ned and his divorced parents.

Holly: This book screams 1985! In fact, it looks even older than that. If it hasn’t left the shelf once in 20 years, it’s a good weeding candidate. If it was written for children who are now divorced themselves, it’s an even better weeding candidate.

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