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military

Lady Soldiers

careers for women in uniform

Careers for Women in Uniform
Heiman and Myers
1971

Everyone knows I have a particular issue with career books. This one is particularly interesting as it is all about recruiting women into the the armed forces. Considering the year this was published, I wonder how many women they actually were able to recruit, given anti-war sentiment at the time. I have to laugh at the author’s attempt to make the military appealing to women by constantly talking about how great the uniforms look. Every other page seemed to say “come join the army and wear a cute uniform.”  Even in 1971, this is a pretty ridiculous strategy for attracting women.

Evidently, this book is all about selling the military to women using clothes, parties, and fun. I keep thinking they are leaving out a few things.

Mary

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Girls Ruin Everything

Weak Link coverWeak Link: the Feminization of the American Military
Mitchell
1989

Submitter: Our public library found yet another interesting book while weeding the non-fiction section. [It] seems much older given its content.  According to its circulation history, it’s rarely left the shelves. Given the dated contents and horrid cover, our patrons show good judgement!

Holly: Oooh, this ought to rile some people up! Take a look at this review in the New York Times, written by Richard Halloran. There are lots of reviews on Amazon too, of course. In 1989 this book might have been a reasonable choice for a public library in the interest of a collection with balanced viewpoints, and also because it was a hot topic back then. There is definitely still a place for this in some research libraries, but I think most neighborhood public libraries with popular materials collections can let it go.

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“It’s Not Just a Job, It’s An Adventure”

Careers in the navyCareers in the Navy
Palladian
1977

Submitter: I have been going through my large local public library and finding lots of gems in their career sections.

Holly: Now, I don’t know Submitter, but it sounds as if maybe they do not work at the library from whence this came. A patron, maybe? How embarrassing! Folks, when your patrons start submitting to ALB, you have a problem.

Let’s start with the fact that 1977 is too old for just about any career book. The navy is a high-tech career that depends on currency! You wouldn’t want to decide to go into the navy, only to find out it is not at all like this book suggests! You wouldn’t even want to write a paper about the thrills of a navy career and receive a big, fat F because your facts are all wrong.

Next, the second page included below says that women are not allowed on ships that may be involved in combat. If you’d like to read up on the Combat Exclusion Policy, you’ll see that it was just last year that it was completely lifted, but even in 1994 exemptions and updates were being made – and that was 17 years after this book was published. It was old before it was even old. Now it’s really old.

This topic is a great addition to a career collection, though, so do update it.

Hooyah!

-Holly

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