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Powerful Reading

man and power textbook cover

Man and Power
The Story of Power from the Pyramids to the Atomic Age
de Camp
1961

What a “powerful” book. (See what I did there?) I guess for 1961, this probably wasn’t a bad choice. I think it is a bit dense and maybe too much. I had trouble following along with some of the diagrams and text, so I wasn’t sure what this book was trying to do: reference? Textbook for a science course? Pleasure reading? Maybe no one else could figure it out either. For a book more than 50 years old, it has held up well.

Mary

 

 

 

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AP CLEP

AP/CLEP Advanced Placement and College Level Examinations in American History
Woloch
1977; Second Printing 1980

Submitter: I’m sure this preparation book for the A.P. and C.L.E.P. exams was extremely useful…in 1980. The patrons at our public library won’t even notice its absence from the shelf!

Holly: There are probably American history topics not covered here that could be on the test: the Gulf War, 9/11 terrorist attacks, Iraq War, etc. Also, evolving terms used to describe cultures and even events might make this book downright offensive.

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Life in the South During the Civil War

Life in the South During the Civil War - coverLife in the South During the Civil War
Reger
1997

Submitter: I found this gem of a book on a shelf in the Juvenile Non-Fiction of our Public Library. There are so many bad things about this book, including that it thankfully never gets checked out. “The Way People Live Series focuses on pockets of human culture. . . .each book. . .attempts to show an honest and compete picture of a culture removed from our own by time or space.” This book is one of the most white-washed books I have ever seen. This book paints a completely different picture of the civil war and slavery than I learned about in school and have read about since. I’ve attached some pictures of passages from the books. There were so many to choose from, I tried to get the ones that really stood above the rest.

Holly: I don’t know about the whole book, but the passages here seem to tell the story of slavery, not the story of life during the Civil War. Does it talk about the war in other passages? Does it talk about black soldiers in the Civil War, or is the war information all from a white perspective too?

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