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Spuds

Potatoes: All About Them
Silvertstein
1976

Submitter: I can’t imagine a better way to turn children off of reading nonfiction than to hand them this book. The information in it is still mostly accurate, but the illustrations are so horribly dated that it’s no surprise this one hasn’t left the shelves since 2007. Time to replace this with a book containing full-color photographs.

Holly: You know what kids really need? A book about potatoes. Maybe a whole series! They could follow this one up with “Yams: Your Friend and Mine.” That said, if there is a current book with nice color pictures about potatoes and a jazzier title and presentation, it would definitely be an improvement. Folks in Idaho might find it useful!

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11 Responses to Spuds

  • All Hail the Cheeseburger Queen!

    Hehehehe.

  • This makes me want to go read Be Bold with Bananas again, just for the mayhem. Maybe it could be used as a coloring book.

  • In the last internal illustration… are they just sorta picking them up OFF of the fields? ‘Cause if I remember my potatoes rightly (and all my Irish relatives would disown me if I didn’t) you have to dig, a lot, to get those suckers out of the ground. Not pluck them like strawberries or something!

    • I suspect the illustration is showing stage two of the process, stage 1 being to dig them up.

    • Well, you do bust a gut digging them — but then you generally let them lie out on the ground for an hour or so to dry off a bit before you store them. So no, not that inaccurate.

      These days, I grow mine in a potato bag. There is very little better-tasting than fresh-from-the-earth potatoes, really and truly.

  • Sadly my local library has a copy. I just checked. Boo!

  • You know, I never knew that potatoes were a “root” vegetable for a long time. That being said, this book doesn’t look too bad – maybe it should be recataqlogues in a different part of the library. Was it in the children’s room?

  • This was cutting edge nonfiction at the time. I know because I weeded a ton of very similar titles from my library! Some of the mid 70s beauty books were especially fun, but all gone. (Although a student checked out Following the Mystery Man today, and I had to laugh,)

  • Tater haters!

  • I guess you cut off comments after some time passes so I haven’t been able to remark on all the jaw droppers here. Mostly I’m flabbergasted by the books you dis (Eric Sloane – “boring”? Huh?). I plan to use your site to add to my Books to Buy list. At least you’re making book resellers everywhere happy by what you’re tossing – but you’re making the library much less fun at the same time. As someone who loves the serendipitous find on the shelves I’m saddened by many of your culls

    • Liz don’t worry there is always stuff to find. Also what is weedable in one library won’t be in another. I promise you always find something! 🙂