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See a Man About a Car

The Professional Automobile Salesman’s Bible
Kerfoot
1979?

Submitter: We found this self-published gem in a sweep of our community college library, and thought it was too embarrassing not to share.  Judging from the inscription at the front of the book, it was a gift to the library from “George.”  (At least, I’m hoping that we didn’t actually buy this book!)  The inscription at the front is a bit hard to read, but goes, “Dear George, Thanks partner and good luck!  Brad Kerfoot”.

Mr. Kerfoot’s insights into female customers (p. 97) and “Jewish, Cubans, Chinese and Arabs”  as customers (p. 100-101) are especially painful.  However, his final parting pep talk (p. 153) and image reminded us who the real winner were…

Holly: I’m so surprised that George didn’t want to hang on to this book and cherish it forever in his personal library!  I mean, the front cover proclaims the author as “The most Dynamic and Result Getting Automobile Sales Trainer in the World.” I guess he wanted to share the wisdom.

11 Responses to See a Man About a Car

  • Shouldn’t it be “See the man, about a car”? I’m assuming you’re thinking of the old Adam-12 dispatcher.

    • Can’t remember my original idea @lurker, but I might have been thinking Adam 12.

  • “these people” Wowzers!

  • Sexist as it may be, I’ve actually been warned that as a woman I had better either know exactly what I’m after or bring a man with me when I buy a car because they frequently try to take advantage of the “fact” that women don’t know anything about cars and aren’t sure how much to bargain. So maybe this is common car salesman advice?

  • Back in the late 70’s I went with my husband to buy a car for me. When we sat down with the salesman he said to me, “Now don’t you worry little lady, your husband and I will take care of all the details. You just pick out the color.” My husband laughed, told the salesman it was my money, my deal and he just lost the sale. We bought the car from another dealer who treated me like an adult with money to spend.

  • Oh, dear God. I’m surprised he didn’t have a section on negroes.

  • When we buy cars, I do the leg work. I ADORE cars, especially those with big block American muscle lurking under the hood. Hey, I drive a Chrysler 300C with a Hemi, for Pete’s sake! My husband is an automotive technician, but he doesn’t care all that much for cars. Me? I can talk shop with the best of them!

    We just bought another car three weeks ago. I went out a day ahead before I left for work (I work the later shifts at our library). I told the gentlemen on two different lots that I am much more knowledgeable about cars than 99% of women and roughly 80% of the men out there. IF he treated me like i had a brain in my head and could talk cars with me,, THEN we would do business.

    We bought from the same lot where we have purchased two other vehicles in the past twelve years. The gentleman was courteous, helpful and honest. If I had been treated like this idiot says to treat women, they NEVER would have gotten our business.

  • “These people are born traders”?

    …does he think Western Europeans never traded in the past? This isn’t just racist, it’s stupid.

  • Not just trading goods, mind you, but “even women”!

    I have been admonished by a car salesman to “just let my man have the car he really wants” because I was trying to point out the obvious flaws of a car not recommended by Consumer Reports. I also ran into a car salesman who wouldn’t finish signing the papers until I hugged him. Clearly this book is still being used as a training manual!!

  • Brad was a personal friend and worked for me in the 1970’s in Winston-Salem, NC. I agree that he was not the most politically correct person around but in those days very few were. As with all stereotypes they are based on truth even if it is not politically correct to acknowledge those truths. Brad was just an honest man telling it like he saw it. He trained a lot of sales people and inspired many and that is a good result that most people cannot claim. It seems as if it is popular to be politically correct even if it requires dishonesty. As a professional Brad was never untrue to himself and told it like he saw it. More people should be so honest instead of ignoring the obvious.

  • Brad was loud, boisterous and cocky, but he knew people and knew car sales. It’s amazing that some pseudo intellectuals, who never knew him, can so easily dissect his intelligence and motives. Apparently, you were not alive in the 60’s and 70’s or you would show more grace toward Brad’s language/stereotypes. However, it is not in you’re DNA to do so. You’d rather sit back on your politically correct high horses and castigate the memory of a good man who was trying to help others become good car sales people. Shame on you and your intolerant views toward Brad!