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Secret Library Acquisition Formula

Development of a Responsive Library Acquisitions Formula. Final Report.
Evans, Beilby & Gifford
1978

Mary: Okay,we are about to wrap up our wonderful library and librarian themed titles with this ultra helpful book from 1978.  Anytime I see “formula”  I get the feeling we are taking an inside peek at some secret all powerful way of doing things.  Do you think the previous formula was non-responsive?

Submitter: Found this—and a whole other pile of doozies—while perusing our Z 675-695 (Library Science) section. (There’s not much left to that section now, but I still say a few relevant & timely books are far preferable to gobs of embarrassingly outdated ones.)  Dig that tape-drive computer behind the guy in the lab jacket, writing notes on his clipboard. I don’t even know what else needs to be said here.

Holly: Absolutely nothing. Weeder!!

5 Responses to Secret Library Acquisition Formula

  • The title alone is so dull I fell asleep halfway through reading it.

  • I *LOVE* it! It looks like the titlepage of something that would be referenced in Crichton’s “Andromeda Strain” (the book, not the film)! It all looks so clandestine, especially the opaque “FINAL REPORT / Project No. 475AH70078”. All we need is a “TOP SECRET” stamp in place of the clipart.

  • It does look clandestine. It would not be out of place if ‘Library Acquisitions’ was some kind of code and in reality it is a manual teaching spies how to acquire secret documents.

  • Um, so what is the guy in the lab coat taking notes of? “10:38 a.m.: Tape drive still spinning. 10:39 a.m.: Tape drive still spinning. 10:40 a.m.: Tape drive still spinning…”

    Either that, or he has X-Men-esque superpowers and can read the data off the tape as it rolls by. Yes, he is MachineLanguageMan, capable of transcribing ones and zeros into English, by staring at magnetic tape!

  • This is almost as good as the “Historic” reader’s advisory pamphlets I inherited as the Teen Librarian at my new job. I especially enjoyed finding the one from 1968 about teen sexual health.