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RIP Anne of Green Gables

anne1

 

Anne of Green Gables
Montgomery
1987 (paperback) original copyright 1908

A friend sent me some scans of this poor book from an elementary school library. It was only recently weeded, but had looked awful for years. This paperback had been in the collection for years and had great circulation. Obviously the tape and other “repairs” were some kind of heroic attempt to save this paperback. It’s 2013, finally we can put this book out of OUR misery.

Mary

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More Bad Processing

 

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12 Responses to RIP Anne of Green Gables

  • Ouch! Poor book. I’m not convinced the amount of tape on that cover would have been that much cheaper than getting a new copy.

  • Wow. Poor Anne.

  • This book is not out of print, so if it is so well circulated, why didn’t this library just order a new copy?

    As a side note, I love this series so much that most of my personal paperback copies look like this – if not worse!

  • My beloved copy had the same exact cover! It wasn’t as abused as this, though.

  • Re: More bad processing
    I’d like to make a pitch for an ounce of prevention. A big part of this damage could have been prevented if a little care had been taken when it was processed.

  • Wow! I confess as a male to loving Anne of Green Gables… and as a bachelor in his late 20s who couldn’t get a date because all the young ladies wanted to marry “a Gilbert”, I took to reading Anne. Purchased her from a second-hand bookstore with a feeble explanation that it was for my nieces (to whom I later read it, so it wasn’t totally dishonest). My mum covered it in brown paper so I could read it on the train. When Matthew died (spoiler alert) I cried and cried and cried. On the train. It was awful. Now I have three daughters and they and their mother have no interest in Anne. But I do know that should their interest ever awake I can get the book at a bookstore, either new or second hand but in better condition than this!

    At least it’s great testimony to the book’s popularity!

  • This is one of my all-time favorite books. I think I even own this particular edition. (I know I have at least one copy with Megan Follows on the cover.) Love the book. Love the mini-series. But, this poor, mangled thing has no business being in a library. Please get a new copy!

  • I have a copy that is not that bad, but very well used. I’ve read it at least 4 times since I was 10 years old. Great book. This library definitely needs a new copy–maybe a hardcover!

  • Good grief! At least tape black tagboard behind the cover! I would probably print the image and match it up under the old cover. That would hold until I replaced book.

  • I wonder if the school library couldn’t put up a call for gently used, unabridged classic books. I bet there are many parents who would be glad to clean out some books that their kids read at the appropriate age but are no longer needed. It would make some space for the parents and the school could weed out damaged books earlier. Just a thought.

  • This book has to be at every used book store in the country, probably in several versions (some stores are very discerning about condition as well). If I saw this thing sitting on the shelf for years I would have gone and bought a copy myself for a couple of bucks and donated it! How can kids learn to love a classic when it comes to them literally in shreds!?