Hoarding is not collection development

Popcorn cookery

Popcorn Cookery
Kusche
1977

I had no idea that popcorn needed its own cookbook. Straight from the 1970s you can make all these cool popcorn snacks. Personally, I was only aware of some basic iterations of popcorn, like regular and kettle corn, but this book introduces grinding popped corn and using it as a filler or as a coating. All worthy ideas, but I keep thinking this is a lot of work.

This isn’t that “awful” in the grand scheme of cookbooks we have had on the site, but it certainly looks old and my particular copy was kind of sad looking. Maybe the cooks out there can give me some insider advice on having a cookbook devoted to popcorn. Is it overkill?

Mary

Classic Cookbooks:

Tuna Chip Casserole or Tomato Cheese Delight?

Sandwiches from Hell

Serving Food Attractively!

 

 

15 Responses to Popcorn cookery

  • I want this book so much. SO MUCH. Firstly because I really like popcorn and would love to do new things with it, and secondly because POPPERPERSON might be the bst new word I’ve heard this year.

  • i’ll put this right next to my cookbook on how to make toast

  • Those popcorn balls…the eyes…

    My God…THEY’RE ALIVE!!!

    Seriously, now, who the hell came up with this thing? Did Orville Redenbacher have a bad acid trip one night?

  • I have a cookbook that is very similar but everything is made with Rice Krispies. Can’t wait until it shows up on this site!

  • Grinding popped corn and using it as a filling or coating sounds like a good idea for gluten-free folks, maybe.

    I think the Christmas tree is quite cute. I think a cookbook devoted to popcorn sounds like a good idea, personally.

  • I just love the science too. I’ve already been wowed by the admonition to keep my corn moist (stop sniggering at the back). I haven’t understood why slightly old popcorn doesn’t pop as well, now I know!

  • Popcorn + Bermuda Triangle must = “I only wanted to see you….bathing in the popcorn rain!”

  • I actually wouldn’t mind having this myself. Is is going to be up for sale once weeded?

  • I love popcorn, but I never knew that the “pop, pop” sound I heard was the way that the corn “expresses gratitude for not being scorched.”

  • I didn’t know that “tastycrunchy” was a word. Then again, I’ve never heard of “popperperson” either, so this book is teaching me all sorts of new things.

  • I eat popcorn because that heavenly aroma sucks me in every time. However, popcorn as filler scares me, because I keep imagining meatloaf with those nasty little husks that get stuck between teeth & gums.

    I suspect this book is a weeder if only because popcorn popping technology has changed radically, since the microwave makes the popperperson virtually redundant.

  • I love the author photo/caption with the plug for his other “bestseller”, because we all know Bermuda Triangle theories are the perfect pairing for popcorn!

    • Actually, it appears that his book was an in-depth study showing that the Bermuda Triangle wasn’t any more mysterious than any other patch of ocean, statistically speaking. And he’s a librarian. I’ve seen him referenced in skeptic circles, but didn’t make the connection until I googled him.

      Neat!

  • My lust for this has not diminished over the weekend. Not one bit.

  • The third picture down, the corny chili pie page, what is that in the top right corner? Is that a glass bowl of popcorn??

    (No, silly! As the caption says, “clockwise from top right: metal bowl of popped popcorn.”)

    Oh! So *that’s* what that is!