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Please take me to the Prom

Junior Prom
Aks
1982

Another special from the teen fiction section. I saw this cover girl and I wanted to know if maybe she had been practicing posing in front of the mirror to make that awful dress look better.  But I digress. Although prom and dating are staples of teen life and fiction, I would imagine this book could be retired quite easily since no one wants Mom’s super cool 80s look.

Mary

More Teen Romance:

Teen Furries

Going Steady

The Day the Senior Class Got Married

 

13 Responses to Please take me to the Prom

  • What, what? Aliens? The hunger games start? The school burns? Grandma fires? I beg you, tell us!

  • The boy owns a handerkerchief. 12 of them. And she’s going to wash and iron one for him. Wow! I didn’t realize my youth was that exceedingly different from my daughter’s…though to be honest, she has often expressed the thought that perhaps all this 24/7 social media stuff does indeed make life harder, and she sometimes wishes modern society had more ‘rules’ and expectations for courtship as in Austen times…that perhaps it was simpler. I think heartache and misunderstanding has always been part of the human comedy, however!

  • “They’re motivated by jealousy, and a need to excel…” That’s *exactly* how 15-year-old boys spoke in 1982. Kids today, they just don’t do the corporate speak.

  • How times have changed! Jeff’s “prom-posal” would be a let-down by today’s standards. My kids tell me that the norm is a cleverly worded sign and at least one romantic gift, followed by a post of the asking on Instragram or Snapchat. I’m guessing Jeff didn’t bother to match his cummerbund and tie to her dress, either. Tsk, tsk.

  • The “French idioms” are actually two lines from the song À quoi ça sert l’amour, written by Michel Emer and famously sung by Edith Piaf. Naughty, unattributed song lyrics!

  • That red corsage is going to look hideous with that mauve dress.

  • Nancy McKeon, is that you?

  • I’m a little confused as to how, according to the back blurb, Amy only knows one boy in her school. Is she a student that just arrived last week? Maybe Jeff is the only eligible guy from Amy’s perspective, but it’s an awkwardly worded sentence. Especially since she names two more boys in the next paragraph. Plus, shouldn’t it be “any boys-except Jeff”, not “any boy?”

  • Uhm, I have a question about American traditions. (I have never been in USA and all my knowledge of that place is from movies and tv-series)

    Is it really true that there is a great big fancy dress-party at the end of school, and girls are not allowed/supposed to go unless they are brought there by a boy?
    And everybody is okay with it?

    • Yes. In my day (graduated in 1978), the principal wouldn’t allow any student, male or female, to go without a date. They were trying to avoid having roving bands of single guys causing trouble, but it was also quite sexist because girls weren’t allowed to ask boys out. So girls had to wait to be asked. The rules have loosened up and I know some girls go in groups now, and same-sex couples are allowed in some schools. And girls probably feel more comfortable asking a boy. I was allowed to ask my boyfriend to my prom because he went to a different school — it was a loophole!

  • Handkerchiefs? A teenage boy has handkerchiefs? Is this the 1980s or the 1880s?