Peace, Love, and Flower Power

A Question for the Ages
Furby

The Hippies cover

The Hippies
Brown, Ed.
1967

This is a basic explanation for those squares who weren’t hip to the groove of Hippies. Published by Time Magazine, this was almost a sociological explanation of those crazy kids. As modern library material, I honestly think there is better stuff out there. It really was written for the establishment types who are long gone. Younger people will need something fresher. It is fun to think that the hippie generation is now getting material on retirement and medicare.

Groovy times!

Mary

The Hippies - Editor's Note

Glimpses of Hippiedom

hippies identify with flowers

hippies' attire

Drop City hippie community

14 comments

  1. Is the picture on the cover covered up by a sticky note? Or did the book just have a big yellow square on the cover?

    1. I usually cover all identifying library marks so no one is “outed” on our website. This particular book someone went address stamp crazy.

  2. In that case, you might want to know that there still appears to be an embossed library identification at the bottom of the cover.

  3. My brother was an original hippie. Not the “flower child” ones shown here, decorated with paint and living in geodesic domes! He lived in an old house, with a dozen other people (“commune”), had long dirty hair, etc. He didn’t go to “love ins” or wear “love beads!” Maybe the photos shown are not representative of the hippies in the US, in fact, in the SF Bay Area. He was no different from his friends. They grew up and moved on, he is still basically the same. Perhaps these are not so much hippies as “flower children” which, at least in SF, were not the same. The song by The Mamas and the Papas wouldn’t have been something “real” hippies listened to! It was originally a promotional song for a “pop festival.” I guess thousands, or millions, of youth took it as a way of life.
    Anyway, the book? No need for it to circulate, but I guess it should be kept since it was published at the height of their popularity. I doubt the accuracy of it, even if it is Time.

  4. Wow, is the whole book as dim and superficial as the excerpts here? The song quoted is about the lamest one I can remember. (And, yes, I CAN remember LOL.) If so, I guess the readers of this book were not very much more hip to the groove after finishing it, alas (nice turn of phrase, Mary!).

  5. I was walking past an assisted living high rise with a friend the other day, and we were talking about how soon we’ll be eligible to live there. She said something about how the staff would have to adjust to people of our generation, but I reminded her the people who can live there now were once Deadheads.

  6. It wasn’t even the Mamas & Papas, if you mean the song quoted in the book pages — it was even an even lamer performer: some one-hit wonder named Scott McKenzie (I just looked it up — that particular bit of info I did not retain). It actually was written by John Phillips of the m&ps, but I guess it was not hip enough for them to record. Also, I think the book quotes the lyrics wrong — geesh.

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