Angel a Day Crafting

Angel a Day

Crafting an Angel a Day
Scott, ed.
2000

If you are a fan of rather weird looking or cartoon-like angels, this book might be for you. There is a wide variety of angel themed crafts. I am not a fan of these types of decorations, but I know a lot of people like this stuff. What I did like about this book were the instructions. The skills required were not ridiculous like some of the books we have featured. Good craft books are really about instruction. This one is better than most. Depending on condition, this might work fine for your collection.

1 or two angels for the Christmas tree, perfectly fine at my house. Any more than that, especially given how these angels look, and I am going to have a problem. If I had to craft an angel a day, I would probably have to be medicated.

Washington Redskins

A Flag on the Play

Washington Redskins
NFL Up Close
Smolka
2017

Since this is a bit more serious than just a discussion on a book, I am filing it under the Practical Librarian tab. This post is a bit longer than usual and illustrates one of the bigger philosophical aspects of collection development. I am only raising questions, and as usual, I am not telling anyone to weed or not weed a particular title. This is only my opinion and reflects some of the discussions I have had with my colleagues.

I was filing some books and this one jumped out at me. It is your basic football book outlining some key players and brief (very brief), sanitized, history of the franchise. Most public library collections probably have a similar set, with extra books on the hometown favorite. My library has a book on all the NFL franchises, but as we are in Metro Detroit, our sports choices will naturally favor Detroit area sports teams.

birth control and protection cover

Don’t get knocked up!

Today we have another teen heath book. It is now 20 years old. Like all medical information, this should be treated as suspect. Even if it hasn’t changed, teens need current information, just like adults. Also, these types of books also have referral information. I actually think this is probably one of the most important features of weeding criteria. Think about what wasn’t around in 2000. Not all businesses or organizations had website or social media presence. No smart phones. Limited texting. (I tried some early texting using only the phone key pad. It took me about a half an hour to write “hi”. No thanks.) Also important, books like this need to look current. Bottom line remember your audience.

Blood Brothers cover

Friday Fiction – Blood Brothers

Blood Brothers
Price
1976

Submitter: This cover is… wow. I’m currently weeding my public library’s adult fiction collection. This particular book last checked out just five years ago in 2015, surprisingly enough. This appears to be a first edition from 1976, and the address stamped in the front of the book is from three library locations ago! The description on the dust jacket begins: “The De Cocos of Co-op City are a family of hard hats who think with their hands and kill with their love.” Judging by the Goodreads reviews, this was a pretty popular book at the time and was made into a movie. Dwindling circulation, a seriously dated cover, and poor condition mean it’s time for this classic to go. One of my co-workers described the cover as “A depressed Freddie Mercury-Sylvester Stallone amalgam is comforted by a younger Paul Dooley as Judd Hirsch looks on.”

Holly: Spot on.

woman style cover

Timeless Fashion

Woman Style
Your Personal Guide to Timeless Fashion
Feldon
1979

Have some Womanstyle, circa 1979. It’s timeless assuming time stops in 1985. The book itself is a basic fashion planning guide. It has all the info on fabrics, style, wardrobe planning, etc. The photography is something else. Soft focus seems to be the photographer’s favorite look for some pictures. Also, since it is about fashion, some of the pictures are not good at showing off the actual clothes.

I was in college at the time of this book and the basic wardrobe was jeans and a t-shirt. Cowl neck sweaters were a thing, but I think that is as far as my friends and I ventured for fashion in the late 1970s. I would have been all over the final picture of the boots and skirt. As you peruse the choices, I better warn you of the picture of the highly decorated reddish/pink room. (ALB is not responsible for any trauma related to looking at this picture.)

Feminist cover

Can I Be a Feminist and Still Like Men?

Ma, can I be a feminist and still like men?: Lyrics From Life
Hollander
1980

Submitter: I work in a small academic library and I can’t figure out how this supports coursework at all. We regularly review the collection and have undergone a couple of major weeds in the last few years and yet this one is still around?

From another staff member: I think it’s safe to say it didn’t age well. While it’s trying to point out ironies of gender roles, it really does revert to sweeping ideas that “All men are one way” and “All women are trying to conform.” Plus, the idea that exposure to Sandra Dee and taking up motherhood is synonymous with throwing your life away.

In short, this book does not fit the mission of our library or the current century, so it must go!

Holly: It also looks a little old and stickered up…and don’t even get me started on barcodes that cover titles!

What is Cancer cover

What is Cancer, Anyway?

What is Cancer, Anyway?: Explaining Cancer to Children of All Ages
Carney
1999

Submitter: This book, designed to help children cope with cancer, is more confusing and just plain weird than anything I’ve seen in a long time. Also, WTF is up with that entity on the cover? It is blonde child with a skin condition? Is it a dog in a wig? Why is it wearing mascara?!

Holly: I don’t find the text in the excerpts pictured below to be particularly child-friendly. The vocabulary is pretty sophisticated. And yeah – weird anthropomorphism. When they’re too human it’s creepy, not cute.

complete guide for the working mother

A step in the right direction?

The Complete Guide for the Working Mother
Albrecht
1967

This book is handy for all those women with money, household help, resources, etc. Even for 1967, this book is out of touch. Even though it probably only applies to less than 1% of working mothers, it does assert that household chores are not the sole responsibility of the mother and that parenting is a family responsibility. I think the author is trying hard to talk about some equality and parenting issues, but not quite ready to take it up a notch. Given the 1967 publication date, that is hardly surprising.

The does say that women can put themselves first. It also advocates for women to take finances seriously. A nice thought, but hardly a real option to lower income mothers. Again, like most of the books about working mothers, there is an assumption of resources, such as hired help, money and time for vacations, etc. Wage inequalities are not addressed. Forget about even mentioning people of color. Maybe this book would work for some upscale suburban consciousness raising group or maybe a book club in the late 1960s, but hardly anywhere else.