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Nightmare in the Craft Section

More Great Panthose Crafts Book coverThe Great Pantyhose Crafts Book
Baldwin
1982

Perhaps I am not the best to judge a crafting book’s weed-worthiness, but I think this book is just this side of disturbing. Evidence is in the first picture below. I am certainly not putting life-size dolls in my living room. I don’t care if they are able to scare off “guests.” They are scaring me! Shady Lady and Granny? Really? I keep looking at these pair of dolls as a madam and one of her working girls. I am not even sure what to say about the footstool featured in the other picture.

Way back in the early days of ALB we ran a book about pantyhose crafts by the same author. That book was part 2 and I was then shuddering that this craft had two books out there scaring the public. Please enjoy this first book since it evidently set the world on fire with all the pantyhose crafting possibilities.

Mary

Granny and Shady Lady

Footstool

13 Responses to Nightmare in the Craft Section

  • The big ones are kind of creepy. I went through a phase where I made the baby dolls out of panty hose and fiber fill. Those were kind of sweet, though the filling would “pill” through the hose.
    Kata

  • My first “Cabbage Patch” doll was actually a pantyhose doll. My mom went shopping too late to find a real Cabbage Patch for Christmas during the big craze, so she found one of these beauties as a substitute. Carrie Ann was twice the size of a Cabbage Patch with very strange looking face and a doughy looking body that was creepy. Needless to say, the next year, my mom moved a little quicker and got the real thing!

  • The footstool has a bad case of edema. It probably ought to see a doctor.

  • I hate those foot stools! I think it goes back to pre-school, they had four in the coat room for us to sit on while we took off/ put on our shoes and they just made me think they were the legs of former students.

  • I had this book. I think it was a selection for the Better Homes & Garden crafts club. Almost every craft book I collected back in ancient history had some redeeming project–maybe just a technique or pattern for one piece of clothing. This one had nothing. And it creeped me out to look through it for solutions. And the booths at craft shows with these dolls also gave me the creeps.

  • I remember those ugly babies. I hated them even as a kid.

  • I love that 80’s font…what is it, Harrowsmith Lite?

  • Some of the lines make me want to LOL: “Although the 2 “ladies” (apt scare quotes) have completely different personalities, the basic bodies are constructed exactly the same.”

    A psych could say so many things about that sentence.

  • The redheaded doll is Chucky 1.0, right?

  • I love that the “Pantyhose Crafts Book” includes what is really a woodworking project. I mean, in addition to spare pantyhose, don’t we all have scrap lumber and a jigsaw around the house?

    As a kid, I had a butterfly made of a wire frame with pantyhose stretched over the wings and stuffed with fiberfill for the body, then painted. That’s *got* to be in this book or its sequel, right?

  • Disembodied (pardon the pun) legs. How charming!

  • Uninvited guests? These would scare off *invited* guests too. Yikes.

  • I collect old stuffed animal and doll craft books, and for some bizarre reason they loved pantyhose in the 70’s and early 80’s. I tried making a doll using it once, and it’s terrible – the stitches pull through, it’s impossible to stuff it and not make it look mumpy and lumpy, and it tears very easily. I honestly don’t know what the attraction was, unless there was some kind massive pantyhose surplus back in the day.