Native Canada

Web of Deception
I want to be a star!

Made in Canada coverMade in Canada
Bonner
1960

I ran across this gem while looking at country books, and found quite a few choice items on our Young Giant to the North.  This book is a book for youth on native people’s art. The language and writing style are very old fashioned and the physical book itself was barely hanging on. For a modern public library’s youth collection, this is outdated and a weeder. I am curious if this book has any significance for historical value? Any art history buffs out there care to weigh in on this?

Mary

Made in Canada contents

Husky dog, Indian travois, Indian paddling

Papoose

French Canadian spinner

The Red Man's Gifts

Made in Canada

7 comments

  1. Anything with “papoose” in it, except as a historical reference, has got to go. Hard to believe there was an era when it was OK to have a separate word for man, woman, and baby depending on race and ethnicity.

    Surely there are newer and better books (in color, for example) showing native art and technology.

  2. To expand on Claudia’s comment, same goes for the term “red man”. That book is thoroughly outdated.

  3. I’m with moklspa. I always assumed “papoose” came from a Native American language. It doesn’t sound like a word Europeans would’ve just tacked on.

    And I don’t know that having a separate word based on ethnicity is exactly racist. I’m pretty sure the women who identify as Latina are in no way offended by being called that. It very much depends on context and word choice.

  4. I am pretty sure that anything of “historical value” in this book has been documented elsewhere. Don’t even try to justify it. Get rid of it.

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