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Kids and Computers

Communicate Online
Rooney
2004

This had a grand total of ZERO circs and it really isn’t that great for content either.  No mention of issues of copyright.  No real discussion of safety other than a comment: “if you see something that upsets you, tell a grownup.”

Okay how about this one:

Make Your Own Web Page
A guide for kids
Pedersen and Moss
1998

Not that bad for HTML practice,but of course dated for what most kids are looking for in computer books.  No discussion of copyright or safety issues either.

Try this one:

Build Your Own Website
Kalbag
1998

I am a fan of Usborne materials from way back.  This one is excellent for 1998!  Although not much on safety issues (maybe we weren’t concerned enough over a decade ago to make it an issue!) but there is a discussion on copyright and using public domain materials.

Of course it wouldn’t be a post from me without a teen nonfiction gripe.  So here it is:

Internet
Craig
2002

The cover is dull but the insides aren’t too bad.  It is a decent overview of careers, e-commerce, and some very brief history.  A brief discussion of security issues and potential safety problems were included.  Not a bad purchase in 2002, but it needed to be gone as soon as Facebook and other social media were part of the teen culture. By the way, this poor book had zero circs as well, so my guess is that these books aren’t meeting the needs of teens anyway.

Run, don’t walk, to your youth technology sections and take a good look.

To all celebrating Thanksgiving, have a wonderful holiday!

Mary

Other Technology Posts:

Artificial Intelligence for the Future

Word Processing 80’s Style

Supercomputers

Careers in Computers or Mullet Fashion Show?

Slide Rules are Too Radical for This Book!

0 Responses to Kids and Computers

  • Are they really meeting the needs of teens? Sorry about nitpicking.

  • You know how MBAs need to take a few years to get “with it” whenever a big change happens? Same goes for things like this. You can get the books on a subject as soon as it hits the “big time”, but ditch them soon because, being first generation, they will age preternaturally quickly.

  • I don’t think teens in 2010 have a lot of needs about learning the Internet in books… In fact, most teens could write a book about using the Internet and give it to their parents.

  • Any computer book is likely to be outdated by the time it hits the shelves, given the length of the publication process and the speed at which technology changes.

    But I love that kid on the first cover. Apparently he used his computer to figure out how to crack the state lottery, judging by his ecstatic expression!

  • Re the first image: “RULE 34! It can happen anywhere, any time!”

  • I see something that upsets me: these horrendous covers. Why do they all have the same color scheme? Same publishers, designers, what?

  • Computer books=purple covers?

  • To me the kid on the first book looked scared like his parents don’t have it on safe search.

  • Kid in the first image: I’M ON AWFUL LIBRARY BOOKS-wait…

  • I own “Make Your Own Page”. I bought a copy in 1999 when I was learning HTML. I was 13. This wasn’t the first book on HTML I’d read, by the time I got it I already knew most of what was in the book. I’d also long outgrown most of flashy picture style of the book.

    I’m keeping mine as a souvenir of the great late 1990s, but given that I know of 10 years doing HTML in 2010, this particular one isn’t appropriate for a library in 2010.