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In the bag

The Best of Shopping Bag Design
Radice and Comerford
1987

Submitter: Recently we began weeding books that were sent to our offsite storage facility.  Sadly this little gem was not weeded before being sent off to storage for 5 years. It must have been a very popular title at the time, as OCLC states that there are 200+ libraries who hold a copy. Amazingly there are quite a few public libraries that still own it.

Some of the bags remind me of the awesome board game, Mall Madness.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MX2hxmfx_Q

Holly: It does remind me of Mall Madness!  Ha ha!  I’ve never worked in a library with an off-site storage system.  What is the criteria for sending something to off-site storage vs. weeding it?  Also, I’d like to point out that Submitter’s email signature listed an architectural college library.  What the heck would an architectural college library want with this book?  I was thinking more like public library teen non-fiction.

5 Responses to In the bag

  • Actually, I once taught some classes in a college with a design school, and this probably would be a useful reference book. At least, when it was timely. 1987 was a long time ago. Although now that I think about it, having a period reference for design topics can also be handy. So, if you were in an institution that had graphic design classes, I’d keep it. It is a funny topic though if you don’t have a professional interest!

  • When I first read the title, I thought it was going to be about designing things with shopping bags – how to reuse/repurpose them. That sounded interesting, even intriguing…but the actual designs on the bags? Wow. I think I’ll pass.

  • Submitter here,
    We are a design school with Architecture as the main name. It was probably useful for the design classes. However I would guess its usefulness ended after 1 to 2 years.

    We are a big library confined to a small space. So we have to send books to our off site storage collection. There is a local company that works with several libraries. We get requested books mailed back to us in about 3 days. Unfortunately, 6 years ago, management just sent every book, that lacked a checkout to storage. Little weeding was done. I have been having to recall books back to see if they should be weeded. This was in a section of store and storefront design books.

  • “Also, I’d like to point out that Submitter’s email signature listed an architectural college library. What the heck would an architectural college library want with this book?”

    Everything. Department stores like Bloomingdales have had architects design their bags. Architects have also done things with corporate logos and otehr aspect of design. One semi-famous architect who did this was Eliot Noyes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eliot_Noyes I am a retail and architectural geek so stuff like this comes naturally off the top of my head.

  • Actually pretty cool idea. I store Christmas decorations in old logo boxes from Halle Brothers, Higbee’s and May Company, just because of the many childhood years those boxes appeared under the tree.