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The Book Blogger Awards 2017

I Can Be an Architect

I can be an architect - cover I Can Be An Architect
Clinton
1986

Bonus points for putting a woman on the cover, but this book is too old to accurately describe the job of an architect. There are no computers shown, for one thing. It’s all heavily-shoulder-padded ladies and wide-tied gents hunched over rulers and drafting boards. The glasses on the woman in the picture below are pure-80s awesome.  Kids come to my library on a regular basis for books for their career reports. I would be embarrassed to hand this to anyone.

Thankfully, I no longer have to. #weeded

Holly

every building was once drawn on paper

8 Responses to I Can Be an Architect

  • Architecture Librarian here! Those drawing are no longer done. Everything is done on the computer now. No more blue prints, black lines, or any drawing at all. In fact, our college eliminated all drawing from the curriculum. :O

    • At my university, they still make architecture students do these things. They don’t permit computer work until senior year.

  • Yes, bonus for showing a woman architect! The field is (evidently, I’m not one to know first hand) still heavily male. Also, prints are no longer “blue”.

  • Dang I HAD those glasses in 1986. They were the bane of my high school existence. Wish I had been born a bit later so I could have been cool during the Lisa Loeb phase…

    • I had some quite similar around that time. They look so heavy on this woman that I think her head is about to drop onto the drawing board.

  • I remember that book series from early elementary school and it would have been the late eighties into early nineties.

  • I was in elementary school around the time this was published and our elementary school library had the whole set of these books. I remember enjoying them as a kid. Thanks for the flashback.

  • I used to work in opticians and remember making up similar frames for people and thinking how fashionable drop-side frames were. They did stop the side blocking peripheral vision.