Hoarding is not collection development
Categories
Taking Your Library Career to the Next Level
PLA Weeding Manual
Making a Collection Count

Best Book Review Blogs” style=

The Book Blogger Awards 2017

Home Repair for the Ladies

Home Repairs Any Woman Can Do coverHome Repairs Any Woman Can Do
Philbin
1973

Submitter: [This] book so obviously dismisses females as able to perform home maintenance. Besides that, the book seems to contain useful information for any homeowner not exactly knowledgeable about construction, plumbing, electrical wiring, and such, regardless of gender. I would not say your “average” male is completely up to code on his TV repair skills either, even accounting for the time period!

Holly: This was a great choice for a public library in 1973 (although I’m not sure the community college in which it was found was ever the ideal place for it). It could have been weeded by the early 1980s at the latest. What was probably empowering in the 70s is demeaning and insulting today.

Home Repairs Any Woman Can Do front flap

Home Repairs Any Woman Can Do back flap

Home Repairs Any Woman Can Do Intro

Home Repairs Any Woman Can Do back cover

Repairs Outside the Home

11 Responses to Home Repair for the Ladies

  • There seems to be an unwritten rule for both genders to always wreck something even more by attempting to fix it yourself before calling a paid professional. 🙂

  • This belongs on the shelf right next to the cookbook I used to own, which featured a recipe for cookies “so simple, even Dad can make them!”

  • I know plenty of men who can barely change a lightbulb, so they might appreciate this book. 🙂

  • Wow, this book isn’t being completely patronizing or anything…

  • Ah, yes, 1973, the year I started college. When men were men, and women were chicks!

    This is the sort of book I wish I could hand every young woman who insists she’s not a feminist.

  • Ditto what Brian said… my husband could use this book. Rename it “Home Repair for Dummies”, and take out all the condescending gender-specific rhetoric, and he’d probably buy it.

    • Bingo. I’ve learned a lot about home repair in nearly 30 years as a homeowner, but I was never exactly Bob Vila. When my wife and I were engaged or newly married her dad asked me, “So when are you going to build your first house?” I must have looked at him like he was from Mars.

      I like the nice feminine font for the chapter headings and the fact that “All by yourself” is italicized on the cover!

  • $15 for a plumber – I think my plumber charges more than that just to answer his phone.

    “See your Yellow Pages”…
    The Yellow Pages are a shadow of their former selves. There was a copy left on my front porch last week, it was around a half inch thick, 20 years ago when I moved into this house it was a good 3 inches, I wish I could shed inches that easily.

  • The modern part of me laughs quite hard at this because it’s so ridiculous to think that women COULDN’T fix things. The logical part of me though, cheers a bit because “those were the times” and this book probably empowered quite a few women to break away from their stereotypical roles and try new things. Bravo for that at least!

  • My electrician and my landscaper are women, and they are dang good.

  • A relative gave me “The Woman’s Hands-On Home Repair Guide” circa 2000 (it’s from 1997).