Hoarding is not collection development

Here Fishy Fishy!

Mount your own fish trophies : a profusely illustrated guide with step by step instructions
Moore
1975

Submitter: I am pretty sure no one is mounting fish trophies anymore. I don’t think anyone will coming looking for this anytime soon. We had a good laugh while looking through it, then promptly removed it from our collection.

Holly: Actually, there may be communities where this kind of thing is appropriate.  This subject, that is.  Not this particular book.  If this kind of thing circulates in your library, please get something newer!  Don’t make people settle for something 38 years old.  If this kind of thing doesn’t work in your library, then it is an even more obvious weeder.  “But it circulates” is not a reason to keep an almost 40-year-old book.  It’s a reason to update it.  This looks like it’s in pretty good shape, so the submitter is probably right that no one is going to come looking for it any time soon.

 

14 Responses to Here Fishy Fishy!

  • Why is this obsolete? There doesn’t seem to be any safety or fashion reasons that this would need to be updated, presuming the demand was sufficient to keep it but not sufficient to add another alongside it.

  • DIY fish mounting? And you wonder why Glade was invented…

  • The instructions for dissection are not bad, but formaldehyde and formalin are seriously toxic and probably unavailable to hobbyists these days! A more modern book is a must for the preservatives alone.

  • Yes, update the book. Mounting fish (and other animals) is still done. The trophy fishermen (and women), and hunters still do it, and there are still plenty of them. At the end of my street is a taxidermy shop! It’s expensive, but I am not sure I would try to do it at home, even with a fish. Do it wrong, it would seem to be that could be smelly.

  • I have a question. What if all the current books on a subject aren’t as good as could be a case in the situation like this one? To give an example in a very different area, I have to go back to the 1990′s to find good library case studies for my management class. The current books of case studies are much more superficial and pose less challenging problems. While some of the facts in the earlier one are dated, the basic principles still apply.

    I’m not defending keeping everything since I’m a strong advocate for weeding, but occasionally a book may be difficult to replace.

  • On this book, all I can say is eeeeeeeewwwwwwwww…..

  • I don’t know what has changed in the years since this was published, but yes, we have quite a few taxidermists here in northern Wisconsin. My husband believes in decorating with dead animals, and his mother even took up the hobby! If she were still alive, I’d have snapped this up if it had been on the sale cart. But then again, I might already have it downstairs in one of the bins…

  • All I know is if I caught a huge fish I’d want to mount it. But I’d pay a professional.

  • Bob, if the treatment of the subject is excellent, I’d keep it alongside the updated copy. I have also noticed the trend, especially in juvenile nonfiction, to provide “text bites” of information instead of in-depth narrative. As a school librarian, I have to consider what information the student AND the teacher are looking for. Some older books explain concepts well or provide the scope that leads to a successful report. In the case of this book, the line drawings may enhance a newer photographic treatment for a hobbyist (though these seem pretty simplistic!). Also, certain “bibles” of a field may be hard to replace.

  • Two things.
    One: I definitely need a fish-mounting book for my library. I can’t believe I’ve been here two years and no one’s asked for one yet.
    Two: I love the use of “profusely” in the title. There’s just a little bit of a negative connotation there, isn’t there?

  • This…is just a whole lotta nasty, right here…

  • Do they show you how to make it sing?

  • Gee, what a great idea of an adult summer-reading activity. Let everyone read The Old Man & The Sea and them come to the library to mount a fish!
    I can smell it now – !

  • Is it only me, or does the word “mount” have certain dodgy connotations?
    Maybe I’ve just read too many (and yes, more than one is far too many) poorly written novels in which the hero mounts his beloved to have his way with her…

    Thoughts of fishy smells beside, this book looks like it is still very useful, in its right environment.
    Maybe a newer version if there is one? Without the toxic chemicals though, I could to with a lot less poison in my environment.