Hoarding is not collection development
Follow us on:
Categories
Making a Collection Count

Fund Raising FAIL

Guide to Successful Fund Raising for Authentic Charitable Purposes
Taylor
1976

Submitter: On my library’s shelves until this week. Perhaps in 1976 this was a good choice because there was little else on this topic. The word “authentic” in the title gives me pause.

Holly: Oooh, we could all use some good fund raising ideas! Unfortunately, I was so bored by the first sentence of the page shown below that I didn’t read any further. Well, I did read the “Scale Showing the Declining Intensity of Responsibility” – which makes sense, though I think they could come up with a catchier title. This book is just old and boring and out of date. You need PayPal and Go Fund Me these days, for one thing. Blah. Get something newer.

More Charitable Causes:

Library Fundraising the Easy Way

Ladies, Come to Order

9 Responses to Fund Raising FAIL

  • The book should be called “Fun With Fonts!”…

    • Crimes against typesetting

    • Please pardon my pedantry, but as anyone in the graphic design, computer-, or manual typography scenes would mention, the actual term is “typeface” unless one is discussing a particular weight and size of a particular typeface, in which the term “font” is accurate.

  • Did we still refer to handicapped children as “crippled” in 1976???

    • I’m not sure, but I do know that even in the late 80s the major charity now known as California Children’s Services was named Crippled Children’s Services, and according to my parents nobody batted an eye at it. (It certainly startled me when I saw it in the mid-late 90s while leafing through my childhood medical bills & parents’ “to-do” notes on paying them!)

      I wonder, am I the only one whose mind automatically substituted “appealing” with “appalling” in that last sentence about stereotyping disabled kids?

  • Actually, I am a lot MORE likely to respond to a charity trying to solve a systemic problem than to the Single Starving Child thing. I don’t even like I’m So Grateful Formerly Starving Child. I think such fundraising is exploitative — designed to make the giver feel bad, then better, not to address the reasons the child is starving.

    But then, I am an overeducated grump. Hey, maybe I should set up a fundraising efforts to prevent Curmudgeon’s Syndrome!

  • 1. For “authentic” charitable purposes? Was there a companion guide for running scams?
    2. Just the other day I was watching an old movie called “Things to Come”. It starts off with a world war that’s so devastating that when it’s over the progress of the human race has been pushed back to Square 2 if not all the way to Square 1. They show a makeshift newspaper reporting that the end of the war is imminent. The headline is typeset in a jumble of fonts that looks like a stereotypical ransom note and that’s what the cover of this cheap-a** book looks like

  • WRT the “authentic” term: I remember seeing a magazine that rented films to libraries, schools, etc. in the 1960s. In the front it had a medium sized warning that you couldn’t advertize that you were showing the films or do certain other things that would make you compete with the commercial theaters because that would violate the license agreement you got the films under.

    So, (a) there may be similar feelings at work here; and (b) clickwrap licenses/TOSes/AUPs/EULAs have a looong pedigree.