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Friday Fiction: The Birds and the Bees

Birds and the Bees coverThe Birds and the Bees
1946 original
1953 paperback

Those bad southern girls have been showing up in my Friday Fiction lately. Remember Shanty Girl?  Today’s young lady hails from a small town in Louisiana and she is about to be married to a nice boy from a nice family. Naturally, she wants to sow her wild oats with a not so nice guy. What do you expect when you name a young lady “Rowdy”?



Birds and the Bees back cover

Birds and the Bees Errant Heart

Birds and the Bees excerpt

8 Responses to Friday Fiction: The Birds and the Bees

  • That cover looks like something out of Reefer Madness; “if you want a good smoke, try one of these!”

  • I do believe a Mr. James Aswell is a nome deplume ? For Noma deplum?

  • And the moral of the story is, if you get a bit fresh with your fiancee, he’ll end up spraining his thumb, and not in a fun way.
    It’ll fun and games til someone loses a thumb!

  • Somebody is offering the paperback on Amazon for almost $30. I wonder if this is a collectors item due to the cover. I hope you saved it for a library book sale.

  • Why is she constantly repeating his name? Since the scene involves only two people, I would think the readers would be able to tell who is talking to who without her beginning or ending every sentence by saying “Price” one or two times. Or maybe the author was just really proud of that name?

  • “She was a dark near inert blur.” WHAT!!?? I assume the raging spring floods are what opened the gateways to all this roadhouse passion. And, yes, I think Price is what she had to pay for this trip to the world of “unknown impulses.” This may well be one the worst of the many poorly written wonders out there—and it was originally in hardback.

  • The reader knows that nothing good is going to happen as soon as “the full dark gonged around them…” LOL! With that and other passages, I wonder if the author maybe read some James Joyce and fancied himself a writer in that style?