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Friday Fiction: Stranger on the Beach

 

Stranger on the Beach
Peake
1979

Yet another example of the tired “guy is a jerk until the right woman comes along” trope for your consideration. You can almost predict the meet (not) cute and the impending “romance”. You know, cuz girls secretly like the jerky, moody types. (Isn’t misogyny cute?)

Anyway, our gal Anna has taken up residence in a friend’s seaside cottage when she wanders into the ever so moody Roc Farrant. (Honestly, the name should have been a solid warning.) He is a jerk, but that’s okay. He just needs the right woman to understand his deep, artistic soul.

I think I threw up in my mouth.

Mary

More romance for the girl with no self-worth or identity:

Another Romance in the Stacks (By the same author!)

Brittle Bondage

Invisible Wife


9 Responses to Friday Fiction: Stranger on the Beach

  • He may be a jerk, but at least he isn’t a taxidermist….

  • Ah, Harlequins…..I first encountered them in my first library (40 years ago). We had a monthly subscription so we got the new titles (a dozen, maybe) every month. I remember one woman with perfect timing — she’d come in on Saturday, check out six, and return them Monday.
    My all-time favorite ALA totebag was produced by Harlequin for its 60th anniversary. It reproduces a wonderfully lurid book cover — a bosomy blonde holding a gun with a dead man in the background. Title: “You Never Know With Women.”

  • This guy sounded a lot worse than the usual jerks. “grasped her wrist and wrenched the hand from her face.” At first I thought he’d hurt her, but no, she’s just a klutz….

  • Is very good regarding the shape the book is in or is it a review? Lol

  • He looks like Randolph Mantooth in the TV series Emergency.

  • 4 years later: Never did it occur to her that she might file for divorce from this chauvinistic and arrogant, moody artist – but file she did…

  • Maybe someone offered a writing prize for using the word “physiognomy” during idle banter.

  • But a patron wrote (in ball point ink!) it was “very good” in cursive!! You have to keep it!

  • I wonder where this was originally published? The UK, maybe? Though the “Very Good” text uses American-style double quotation marks, the sample internal pages do not. Other things are the non-American approach to restrictive clauses (although that could just be an error) and some vocabulary choice (would an American girl say “I dare not?”) and spelling.