Friday Fiction: Nurse + Doctor = Romance!

Fashion for Pregnancy
Marriage Hygiene from Olden Times

First Year's FancyFirst-Year’s Fancy
Collins
1983

Our cute nurse, Phyllida (haven’t heard that name in a century or two), is a cute, but klutzy nurse. She means well and she isn’t hurting any patients. (That we know about, anyway.) “Dangerously” handsome Ross is the doctor. Sparks fly. Of course there are other players in this drama. Jealousy and ambition are big themes. Will this lovable nurse and ambitious doctor finally get together? Stay tuned!

Mary

10 comments

  1. Wasn’t George Clooney Doctor Ross in the ER program on TV? I never watched it, but I saw what I’d missedonce he got to be a movie star…

    1. You didn’t miss much. Clooney is such a bad actor that the show was only watchable once he left. Only good thing about when he was there Rosemary Clooney would guest star once in awhile as a woman with Alzheimer’s.

  2. Not sure about a hospital but at college the registrar’s office was where we went to sign up for classes.

  3. What a dingbat this Phyllida must be. She’s meeting up with someone from work who she’s forbidden to consort with and she chooses a pub across the street from the nurses’ residence that’s a hangout for the hospital staff. I dare say she’s on the klutzy side as to common sense as well as physically.

  4. “Registrar” and “houseman” are words similar to our medical “resident” and “intern,” I believe. Could someone give me the phonetic pronunciation of Phyllida?

  5. Apparently ‘registrar’ is a sort of medical specialist, or someone training to be a medical specialist.

  6. OK, I went to Dictionary.com and found these:
    3. ( Brit ), ( NZ ) a hospital doctor senior to a houseman but junior to a consultant, specializing in either medicine ( medical registrar ) or surgery ( surgical registrar );
    4. ( Austral ) the chief medical administrator of a large hospital —
    I expect the blog will change the formatting, so I hope this is still readable. Anyway, it appears that definition 3 would apply. Would “houseman” equate to the U.S “house staff,” which is interns and residents?

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