Hoarding is not collection development
Follow us on:
Categories
Making a Collection Count

Family Fun with Alzheimer’s Disease

Maria’s Grandma Gets Mixed Up
Sanford
1989

I know all of you look forward to when our favorite author discusses major social problems. This time Doris tackles Alzheimer’s disease. Given the destructive nature of Alzheimer’s, books geared to kids should be part of any collection plan. I think we can skip this one, though.

Maria’s grandmother is living with her family and she has memory problems and gets “mixed up”. Maria prays about it and then the book ends. Mostly it is a description of the grandmother’s “wacky” problems with dementia. I am still trying to figure out the picture with the giant hands…

Mary

Be sure to check on Doris’ other gems here in the Doris Hall of Infamy category! You won’t be disappointed.

More Bibliotherapy for the kids:

Lee, the rabbit with Epilepsy

AIDS in the End Zone

Partying Horses (This is a long time ALB favorite you don’t want to miss! Also, it is worth reading through some of the comments as well.)


12 Responses to Family Fun with Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Giant hands are just an attempt at perspective, but since the artist otherwise sticks with medium and long shots, it feels off.

  • I think the giant hands are one of those idealistic pictures to show us how Grandma feels. I think it’s odd that the little boy has to clean up the dog food mess. It looks like the rest of the family isn’t glued real tight either….

  • As Doris goes, I’m going to say this one isn’t the worst.

  • My grandfather has dementia. One time my mother told me she had a dream that he was cured and back to the way he was. I also have dreams of visiting my grandparents when he was still healthy. At least we still get to see my Poppy this way in our dreams…but it’s still kind of sad when we wake up and know it wasn’t real.

  • Holy smokes. Doesn’t sound as if the author has ever really truly dealt with someone with Alzheimer’s. (I, among sad legions, have.) As for the giant hands…hard to tell if it’s perspective issues or “symbolic” (grandma feeling like a little baby…though if she has reached the incontinence stage, it’s likely she wouldn’t have the comprehension to know it’s a belittlement in a way). Either way…that diaper ain’t big enough…looks like it’s for a newborn! Ultimately an offensive book despite the fact it’s well meaning…makes the poor grandma look random and insane, not suffering from an illness that is tragic.

  • Why does Juan have to clean it up? I want to know more about Juan.

  • I just realized this is the saddest fictional neighborhood ever…

  • Grandma looks like a young girl in some of those pics…I thought she was Maria at first. I don’t see any helpful hints on dealing with this except praying, and not everyone believes in that. On another note, I’m disappointed that apparently the author of Latoya the Partying Horse never made good on her promise of a sequel.

  • Oh, Doris. I had been waiting for a more in-depth look at this book ever since I first saw the weird picture of Grandma cowering at the sight of a too-small diaper from somewhere else. It does not “disappoint”.

    Is it me, or does the picture of everyone laughing look more like a dance party because of their odd positions? Poor Juan…

  • For someone who apparently never spent any time with children, Doris certainly was prolific, wasn’t she?