Drink Up!

Barbara Walters Unauthorized
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Urine TherapyUrine Therapy: Nature’s Elixir for Good Health
Peschek-Bohmer and Schreiber
1999

Let’s not dismiss this book just because its subject seems controversial or taboo. It wasn’t the worst choice for a public library in 1999. I think the authors could have done a better job of differentiating between “treatment” and “cure,” but they do technically use the word “treatment.” They are just really insistent, complete with testimonials from patients, that urine therapy will work for you. You just have to get over your squeamishness and give it a try. Down the hatch. Cheers! Prost! (The authors are German, after all.)

The ailments listed on the front cover are pretty benign, but the book gets into more serious diseases and conditions like herpes, glaucoma, and back pain. Hey, Mary, if your sciatica is acting up, just drink pee.

I did have to chuckle at the chapter called “Cocktail Hour.”

-Holly

Urine Therapy back cover

Urine Therapy contents

Urine Therapy contents

Urine Therapy testimonials

Urine Thearpy testimonials

cataracts, glaucoma, and ear pain

sciatica

herpes

16 comments

  1. I know that public libraries are supposed to be descriptive rather than prescriptive but this is real pseudo-science and medical pseudo-science is the most dangerous.

  2. I’m honestly curious about what criteria public libraries use when purchasing books. I would consider this item to be absolute garbage but I also have the same opinion about much of the stuff promoted by Dr. Oz or found on the “Goop” website. However, it’s obvious that a lot of people do believe in “alternative medicine”; does this mean that libraries should carry books on these subjects? On a personal note, I’m acquainted with a woman who is spending $500-$700 per week to treat her breast cancer using “acupuncture, TCM herbal remedies and multiple different Energy healing modalities” (whatever that means). I find this both sad and appalling.

  3. Being German doesn’t automatically make you an expert on medicine any more than my being Canadian makes me an expert at playing hockey. In fact, I hate hockey.

  4. What’s old is new again. Though my education is in the Western medical tradition, I’ve been taught to be mindful of traditional medicines. Certain things I think are harmless if used as a supplement instead of a substitute. This is one treatment I would avoid. Besides just sounding gross to me, urine is only sterile until it reaches the urethra.

  5. Are they taking the p? Very much agree with Thipu that this is dangerous pseudoscience. Urine, by its very (obvious) nature is a waste product which the body needs to expel. Even if it is only (re-)applied externally, it’s still filthy and unhygienic; its smell is just one of many clues indicating that urine should be completely disposed of!

  6. And sadly people are still doing this. In fact, I follow a number of pro-vaccine pages on Facebook and apparently anti-vaxxers are not only drinking their pee they’re also INJECTING it. So I suppose an updated version of this book would include injecting “aged” urine. BLECH!

  7. Ok Im going to be the only one who doesnt completely dismiss this book, I know it will sound gross but I know for a fact that urine does help cure eye infections…pink eye to be exact.2 days in to a 10 day camping trip and oh joy…I get pink eye. A gal we were camping with suggested using my own pee..yuck I know but I was miserable and kinda stuck w no options. So I tried it. 2 or 3 days later voila,no more pink eye. I later suggested the same cure to my mom, she actually tried it too and also was cured in a few days!!!!

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