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Daddy is a Monster

My Daddy Is a Monster… Sometimes
Steptoe
1980

Submitter: This paperback book was in my library in the Easy section. Thankfully, it no longer is in my library. The story is strange and is written using slang. The illustrations are hard to understand. It was discarded for many reasons – paperback, circulated only twice since 1996!, and the story is weird!

Holly: The illustrations are cool! I really like the style. The back cover (shown below) calls this a “warm and humorous family story.” Booklist even says it has “affectionate family interaction.” I’m not seeing that in the few pages submitted, and I’m definitely not getting any warm fuzzies from the story!

More Awful Picture Books:

Beyond Awful…the “Great” Beyond!

More Death, No Kittens

It’s Okay to Say Don’t

Bedtime Story with a Nice Side of Guilt

12 Responses to Daddy is a Monster

  • Usually just lurk, but I felt the need to point out this is by Caldecott Honor and Coretta Scott King winner John Steptoe, a narrative from the perspective of his own children in their own voice. I remember (as a kid) reading it in the late 80s after reading Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters and seeking out more Steptoe. Admittedly, if it’s not circulating, then so be it, and it has aged, but it’s definitely not an awful book.

  • I stopped reading at “Javaka”….

  • This reminds me of a children’s book called “My Mother Is Weird”. It’s where a girl’s mother looks like a monster when she gets up in the morning but turns into a sweet, nice mom after she has her Elixir of Life, better known as coffee, lol. Then one day the coffeemaker breaks and the mom still looks like a monster until her daughter hugs her and says “I love you”. Awww. 🙂

  • From the title, I was expecting Doris…

  • Regardless of the content, Daddy Is a Monster… Sometimes has got to be the most upsetting title for a non-Doris Sanford picture book.

    • Yeah, this is about Doris level with its light treatment of what seems to be a serious anger issue. I’d like to know what made this book “warm and humorous” like the back cover says.

    • Yes! I thought the cover illustration was kind of cute, but then I read the title and it got really dark.

  • @Submitter: “The story … is written using slang”: I think the word you’re looking for is ebonics

  • The reviews on Amazon are all amazing. Also, Javaka is the name of the author’s son, who is himself an award winning author and illustrator. I’m seeing what seems to be a knee jerk reaction to the title, the description of the language used, and the names of the children. It might not be what a particular library needs to keep on its shelves, but that doesn’t make it an awful book.

  • you need to read the rest of the book. The daddy in it is anything but a monster.