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Making a Collection Count

Copy Machine Art

Copier Creations: Using Copy Machines to Make Decals, Silhouettes, Flip Books, Films, and Much More!
Fleischman
1993

Submitter: With all the free or low-cost publishing and photo editing programs in existence, why would we want to encourage children to make multiple copies of pictures so they can make their own stamps or films? I do enjoy fostering creativity in my young patrons, but there are better ways to do this.

Holly:There might be a few good projects in here for teachers or children’s librarians, but even so…Submitter is right. It’s waaaaay easier to do these things on computers these days, and with more polished results. Sometimes I help people with elaborate projects on the library copy machines and think to myself how much easier it would be to download some clipart, copy/paste in Publisher, and be done with it. I’m sure that people without computer skills would disagree, but those people don’t tend to be able to handle our fancy new copy machines on their own either.

More Elaborate Crafts:

Typewriter Town

Felt Up!

MOAR Pantyhose Crafts (with originals Pantyhose – Not Just For Legs and Nightmare in the Craft Section)

Groovy Pillows

DIY Boyfriend

6 Responses to Copy Machine Art

  • Oh hell no! The 15 cents we charge per copy will NEVER make up for the amount of toner this would use, PLUS they’re gonna want us to make the copies for them and I HAVE A REAL JOB, I DO NOT SIT AROUND WAITING FOR YOU TO USE THE COPIER…… yeah I’m not even 30 and I’m already burnt out on the public library. :/

  • I kind of want this book. I mean, I know computers are better but I have a soft spot for the old school zines made on copiers.

  • I had to do a clip art copy machine project in college for my Educational Media class. I’m a pro at cutting out the clip art and using lots of scotch tape to prevent black smudges.

  • Yeah-but dept: Yes, this is outdated now. I doubt it has gone out recently (like this decade), and it can probably be discarded. But it was pretty high-tech for the early nineties, just before the Internet and computers (at work or at home) with decent modern printers (not the glorified-typewriter kind) became popular — i.e., back when “clip art” literally meant clipping, with scissors.

  • Although using the computer makes it more polished, this could be a good pick for a library with a zine program or collection. I’ve also noticed more and more articles online about basic household hints and life hacks that used to be common sense, so there is a place for these techniques if the book is circulating!