Columbus and the Age of Exploration

Adventures in Salad
Satan's Music

Columbus coverColumbus and the Age of Exploration
Ross & Stott
1985

Submitter: I am a youth services librarian in a public library and this book was recently brought to my attention from a patron. Upon examining, with much giggles and then gasps of horror from ALL the staff, we decided it would be best to pull this one from our JUVENILE NON-FICTION (!!!) collection. While there may be a blurb along the side captioning the thoughts of the new peoples and places that the early explorers may find, it’s still rather a disturbing addition to ANY collection.

Holly: I’m pretty sure cannibalism is not part of common core curriculum.

cannibals

9 comments

  1. Columbus and his crew on the cover don’t look like very nice guys. From what I’ve recently read up on about Columbus, “not very nice” is an understatement.

    1. Probably an astrolabe, an instrument for calculating latitude. It took several hundred years and development of accurate clocks for sailors to determine longitude.

    1. What, you’ve never heard of the Blemmyes?

      Or seen Othello?

      “And of the Cannibals that each other eat,
      The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads
      Do grow beneath their shoulders.”

  2. Knowing the importance of Harold Ross to “The New Yorker” magazine, William’s son Wallace gamely served as a model. (If that is a pelican, wouldn’t it prefer webbed feet?)

    This gripping book provided a role model for 21st century male athletes (with Alamy’s website confidently asserting, without a cite for its statement, that the painting “has since been determined to be a portrait of Giovanni Battista Castaldi, not Vespucci, and probably originally painted by Michelangelo Anselmi”.) The attention to detail also inspired the “Fargo” woodchipper scene.

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