Hoarding is not collection development
Categories
Taking Your Library Career to the Next Level
PLA Weeding Manual
Making a Collection Count

Best Book Review Blogs” style=

The Book Blogger Awards 2017

Bleeding Edge

Technology and science related posts are included in this category.

Games People Play

More New Games…and Playful Ideas from the New Games Foundation
Fluegelman
1981

Submitter: The book about new games is from the early 1980’s and to me it looks like it was put out by some dirty  hippies who wanted to play ‘games’ that taught lessons and allowed for lots of group groping.
Holly: Well, it’s certainly seen better days physically, anyway. I’d weed it on condition alone.  Sucks to be the girl at the far right of this picture.  I mean, she doesn’t get a back rub in the “group back rubs” that you’re “all set up for” at the end of the game.

Continue reading

What makes TV work?

What Makes TV Work?
Corbett
1968

Love this cover!  Actually given the age, this particular book was in great shape.  I do have issues with the currency.  No mention of digital tv, DVR or hundreds of channels.

I had to explain to my kids that I only had 3 channels growing up and that was depending on the weather.  In addition, we actually had to get up out of a chair to change the channel.    I also remember having to stand with the rabbit ears in a certain place to get a decent picture.  Kids today have it so easy!

Mary

We All Live in an Atomic Submarine

Let’s Go Aboard an Atomic Submarine
Hamilton
1965

Submitter: Let’s not and say we did!

Holly: Sally and Joey sure look excited for their vacation, though!  Nice cover art.  This children’s book explains what nuclear submarines are and how they work.  Atomic energy was all the rage in the 50’s and 60’s, so kids back then probably loved this kind of thing.  It was probably the equivalent of today’s kids reading about…wait, today’s kids are more interested in playing Atomic Submarine Kill Zone Spectacular for whatever game console they have.  (I made that up – it doesn’t exist!)  Really, though, what IS the use of this book in a public library children’s section now?

Continue reading