Hoarding is not collection development
Follow us on:
Categories
Making a Collection Count

Sports and Exercise

Coaching, sports, working out and training.

That’s One Badminton

Badminton - coverBadminton
Sports Techniques Series
The Athletic Institute
1969

Submitter: Make them go away!  These sports books are the walking dead of our collection–never quite eliminated. They keep staggering into view. I’m sure the game and terminology hasn’t changed much since 1969, but I’ll be looking for a replacement with color illustrations and players who don’t look embalmed.  The cover is so boring, no middle schooler here has ever opened it–oh, what they were missing!  Another one bites the dust!

Holly: Oooh, yeah. If this was for middle schoolers, the cover alone is the kiss of death.

 

 

 

Continue reading

Jump for Joy

Jump for Joy - coverJump for Joy: The Rebounding Exercise Book
White
1984

Submitter: I work in a public library and this book came in from one of our partners to fill a reserve.

Holly: I bet the patron who requested it was disappointed, although the 1984 pub date should have tipped them off. The black and white pictures, as well as the models’ outfits, are pretty dated. I especially like the business man who keeps a trampoline in his office, pictured below. My staff would never let me hear the end of it if I was bouncing around in my office.

Continue reading

Jim “Catfish” Hunter

Jim Catfish Hunter - cover
Jim “Catfish” Hunter
Burchard
1976

Submitter: I weeded this book from an urban [elementary] school library. In the introduction it compares professional baseball to slavery, because the players are traded from team to team. I guess that’s the kind of racist comment that was considered acceptable to print in a children’s book in 1976. It gives a very clear answer to the difficult question many libraries with tight budgets struggle with: Is it better to have an outdated item on a topic, rather than no items on a topic? NO. This library now has no baseball biographies, and that’s okay.

Holly: Kids today are not interested in every single sports star from their parents’ generation. There are some, for sure, who will never be bad subjects for a school library collection (Babe Ruth, for example), but keep the books themselves up to date! If Jim “Catfish” Hunter is worthy of the collection, there will be a newer book available. (Never heard of him…but admittedly I’m not a baseball fan.) I’m with submitter: NO books on a topic is better than only awful ones.

 

Continue reading