Reinforcing Reference Skills

Library Reference Activities for the Kids

Reinforcing Reference Skills
Activities that go beyond the encyclopedia
Benjamin
1986

A librarian pal of mine found this gem in the supposed “professional collection” as she cleaned out a cubicle for a new employee. Obviously no one had touched this in years, given the amount of dust and grime present. This one was catalogued and sat around for decades, unused.

Let me go back and harp on using a shelf list. Your system should allow you to dump your catalog into some kind of report. Do not run the shelf list for the entire library. Pick collections carefully. Even the largest libraries can break out collections into small chunks. Reorganize your list of books by date (oldest to newest) and take a look. Even this one small activity can yield some surprising results. (By the way, if you do this, please send us some pictures of any of your ridiculous finds.)

Happy National Library Week and stay well,

Mary

ref interview cover

Creative Reference Interview

The Reference Interview As A Creative Art
Jennerich and Jennerich
1987

As it is National Library Week, it is time to do some professional development. Let’s start with improving our reference interview techniques. Are they creative enough? This is the book for you.

For the most part this is standard stuff we learned in library school. If you are old enough, this could have been one of your old texts from library school. However, if you had this in a professional librarian collection, I don’t think anyone would find it helpful. By the way this was weeded from a public library pro collection. (In actuality, I bet someone dumped a textbook from library school into the collection and I’m willing to bet after the cataloger put it in the collection, it never moved until it was weeded in 2019.

library skills

Library Skills for the Kids

Teacher’s Portfolios of Library Skills
Weisburg and Toor
1985

Happy National Library Week, everyone. Over the years, we here at the ALB home office like to use NLW as an annual reminder about professional collections. Yes, I realize most of us are sequestered due to COVID-19, so take a note for when we get back to the books and patrons.

This little gem is from 1985. It was weeded in February 2020. If this is something you are using in 2020, I think it might be time to update your lesson plans. For those of us of a certain age, this is a nice nostalgic visit to libraries of yore. Note the entire chapter on those fun card catalogs.

finger plays

Old School Finger Plays

Let’s Do Finger Plays
Grayson
1962

A colleague was cleaning out the youth storytime collection when she ran across this little blast from the past. Of course we both knew immediately that we were looking at an antique given the “attractive” library binding. I recognized quite a few rhymes that are still going strong at storytimes. It’s a weeder since the librarian who found it buried in the collection had been here 12 years and was sure no one had needed it (or even knew it existed). Despite having a few redeeming qualities, it just needed to go for the casual racism and rather crunchy pages.