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Friday Fiction

Most Fridays we feature a fiction title that is usually anything pulp, odd covers, odd titles and anything else worth discussing! These are NOT necessarily awful.

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My Dream is Yours – Friday Fiction

Cover of My dream is yours

My Dream is Yours
Asquith
1973

Another romantic tale for your Friday Fiction. Flip (yes, that is her name-short for “Phillipa”) grew up as an orphan and doesn’t seem to have a pedigree that one would call “impressive.” Michael, Flip’s intended, wants to make a good impression. From the text, Michael seems to be more worried about impressing his mother than his girlfriend. (Flip, honey, this is a giant red flag!)

Michael takes Flip home to meet the family. Naturally, the matriarch seems less than impressed with Flip’s humble background and her career as a fashion model. A family friend is also in attendance, and of course he absolutely dislikes her career choice. Robert, a doctor, dismisses her lifestyle and career as  frivolous. You guessed it, he ends up as “the one.” Poor Flip.

Mary

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Friday Fiction: Australian Hospital

Australian hospital romance cover

Australian Hospital
Dingwell
1980 (original copyright 1955)

I found this book digging through the donation pile and loved the cover art. I think the drama of the woman biting her finger is just awesome. Dingwell’s catalog of over 80 titles is impressive by any standard. I usually get a kick out of these vintage titles for the cover art alone. The women always look a bit unhinged, and this one is no exception.

We featured a few of her books: Sister Pussycat (who doesn’t love that title?) and Nurse Smith, Cook.  This title is similar to most romances of the period. The awful guy is the right guy and there is the requisite misunderstanding between our lovers. Don’t worry, things will all work out by the end of the book.

Mary

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Friday Fiction – Anne of Green Gables

Series: Anne of Green GablesAnne of Green Gables (series)
Anne of the Island, Anne of Ingleside, and Further Chronicles of Avonlea
Montgomery
1915, 1939, and 1920 (original publication dates)

Submitter: 25 – 30 years ago, my mom sometimes worked a shift at a tiny branch library near our home. The whole family has since moved away, but a few days ago we did a road trip and visited old friends, and we stopped by the lovely new branch library that has replaced the tiny old one. While browsing along the YA shelves, I was stunned to see these books, sad remnants of the entire series that once lived on the shelves. As a kid, I frequently saw these exact volumes and marveled at their ugliness. They were old and hideous then, and were probably largely responsible for my reluctance to read anything Anne-ish. (Jonathan Crombie later changed my mind, and I read them many times over — in new paperback editions!). I can’t BELIEVE these books are still there. Somebody chose to pack them up and move them to the new branch! And clearly, new generations of young readers are still refusing to pick them up, because they aren’t worn out YET.

Holly: Wow! They really should replace these with newly published copies with modern-looking covers. A brand-new, squeaky-clean library branch deserves some shiny new classics. These have what Mary calls “mom stink” on them. Anything mom loved or that looks like it came from mom’s era is an automatic no-go for some kids. Depending on the publication date of these copies, they might be collector’s items! In other words, inappropriate for your basic public library teen collection where they will not be carefully handled.

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