on our own cover

Friendships Tested: Old Friends, New Friends

Old Friends, New Friends
On our own #4
Quin-Harkins
1986

Jill and Toni are besties and are ready to start adulting for real. Both of them plan to attend State U. Then Toni doesn’t get to go to college because of family problems and Jill gets a chance to get into that super first tier school called Rosemont. Everyone is having a difficult time. Jill gets a horrible roommate and Toni tells off the icky roommate when she visits Jill. Friendship troubles just blossom. Happily enough, they get their issues sorted and come to a new understanding. Growing up is difficult.

Kissing Doorknobs

Friday Fiction – Kissing Doorknobs

Kissing Doorknobs
Hesser
1998

Submitter: “Weaknesses: Keesha is Black and her dialog is in a quasi-Ebonic style, which doesn’t go over well now. Donna is a “bad girl” and goes to a home for expectant mothers. The parents, even though they have seen Tara’s behavior for years, refuse to believe anything is wrong with her. This is dated in so many ways.

What I really think: Treatment and perception of OCD has changed so much in the last 20 years that I will weed this book. It hasn’t been checked out in a while, doesn’t smell great, and is a bit more YA than most of my titles now. My readers have been skewing younger for some time now. No idea why.”

Dinky Hocker Shoots Smack cover

Friday Fiction: Dinky Hocker Shoots Smack

Dinky Hocker Shoots Smack!
Kerr
1972

Submitter: This was . . . probably an OK book in 1972? And probably great in our context (small rural town in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula – about as far as it gets from Brooklyn.) I might take it home and read it. There’s a cat named Nader! The boy wants to be a librarian! It was adapted into an After-School Special! But it’s 2020. Our current YA patrons’ mothers are too young for this book. Also, it’s a mass market paperback in a library binding – the pages are brittle and falling out. It’s time to go.

Addie Accident cover

Friday Fiction: Addie Accident

Addie Accident
Corlett
2010

Submitter: My local public library in Australia sells weeded books for 20c each. I sometimes buy children’s books for a holiday program book corner. Usually they are fine, but I always examine them more closely before donating them. Thank goodness I did look more closely at ‘Addie Accident’. The cover and basic story are cute and magical, but some of the events are not appropriate for that type of book and overall message of the book is problematic.

cover of hickle going to school

Pickle Acceptance

Be Cool, Going to School
Hickle Pickle Books #3
Smith
1994

Okay, this is a weird one. Evidently an alien pickle shows up and heads to school. I am not sure of the origin story, perhaps that is in the earlier part of this 6 part series. His name is Hickle. Hilarious, right? For reasons that are not quite clear, he is interested in where dill pickles came from. (Genealogy project?)

Blood Brothers cover

Friday Fiction – Blood Brothers

Blood Brothers
Price
1976

Submitter: This cover is… wow. I’m currently weeding my public library’s adult fiction collection. This particular book last checked out just five years ago in 2015, surprisingly enough. This appears to be a first edition from 1976, and the address stamped in the front of the book is from three library locations ago! The description on the dust jacket begins: “The De Cocos of Co-op City are a family of hard hats who think with their hands and kill with their love.” Judging by the Goodreads reviews, this was a pretty popular book at the time and was made into a movie. Dwindling circulation, a seriously dated cover, and poor condition mean it’s time for this classic to go. One of my co-workers described the cover as “A depressed Freddie Mercury-Sylvester Stallone amalgam is comforted by a younger Paul Dooley as Judd Hirsch looks on.”

Holly: Spot on.

book cover of catcher in the

Catcher in the Rye turns to dust.

Catcher in the Rye
Salinger
Mass Market Publication 1964
Original copyright 1951

Another Swedish Death Cleaning find…

No, I do not think for one second that Catcher in the Rye is awful. (Please don’t take the name of this website literally.) Personal aside, this book isn’t one of my favorites, my initial reading as a teenager was the 1970s version of “meh”. I re-read it as an adult in my 30s, as a project to re-read classics from high school and college. Unlike other classic titles, my opinion didn’t change too much.

That said, this book is part of my Swedish death cleaning project and it is my husband’s book. Actually, his older sister had her name in the book and I believe he “borrowed” it when he was in high school. Whoops.