Hoarding is not collection development
Follow us on:
Categories
Making a Collection Count

Cash for Kids

Extra Cash For Kids
Belliston and Hanks
1982

This book arrived complete with dirty cover, pages missing and a many pages were underlined and marked. So easy decision is to weed it because it is in awful condition. If I could just be permitted a brief rant on paperback editions, please. Folks, they are not meant to be permanent.  In a library setting, a well-used paperback is not going to last but a few years.  Since we have been doing this site, I have run into more ridiculous repairs on books that should have been retired a long time ago.  I am also appalled at staff time and materials being hopelessly applied to a four dollar book.  (Please do the math before “rescuing” a pathetic paperback!)

Anyway, back to this title.  In 1982, this was a great choice for a public library youth non-fiction collection. I would guess that many of the ideas presented would still apply today.  I am not a big fan of the illustrations, but this is still a good topic for a youth collection. I just think we can find something more current with some eye appeal for today’s youth.

By the way, does the “Halloween Insurance” smack of a protection racket?

Mary



 

 

11 Responses to Cash for Kids

  • Cleaning airplanes?? Where, exactly…?

  • I used to live in a beach community. The library maintained a supply of paperbacks (fiction mostly) so that people could take them to the beach and it didn’t matter of sand got into the pages or the bindings.

  • Too funny about the Halloween insurance. Also, selling furnace filters? Of all products, why furnace filters?

  • In a way, I’m amazed that so many of these could still work as money making projects-the errand service, for example- but cleaning airplanes? Really? Even in 1982?

  • I figured they meant private airplanes. Am I the only person that lives in the middle of nowhere with half-a-dozen small airstrips in a hundred mile radius?

  • Newspaper clipping service: online news
    Making and selling pet ID tags: most supermarkets have a station where you can get an engraved one for not that much
    But I guess some still apply. Man, airplane cleaning.

  • May I suggest that everyone starts by cleaning ANY and EVERY airplane you ever travel in? Next time you exit an airliner, just take a look at the filth piled up everywhere. It is always worse than the slummiest area of any city. Why? Probably a nervous reaction to flying – everybody is secretly convinced throughout every flight that it will crash – but no excuse for the revolting mess that’s always left behind by otherwise decent, respectable folk.

    You won’t get PAID for ‘leaving the aircraft as you would wish to find it’, but you will maintain a bit more human dignity than if, like the vast majority, you just can’t be bothered.

  • Up until September 2001, hiring a kid to clean the outside of flight-school aircraft was pretty common at a lot of small airports. The people I worked for did it. Now, things have changed, as you can imagine.

    The youth group of a small-town church I attended sold Pink Flamingo Insurance. You could buy a policy for a buck or so, but someone could top your bid and you’d come home from work or wake up to find 40 pink flamingos in your yard. It cost $15 to get them removed, unless you had to do it yourself like I did (I lived in an apartment and the landlord had NO sense of humor). Yes, it was a shake-down, but a fun one.

  • They forgot making expensive gym shoes, assembling electronics, and sewing Walmart clothes.

  • Amy–I wouldn’t go that far, but I live in the middle of nowhere and we have two private airports within an hour or so drive.

    TXRed–I’ve actually heard of that pink flamingo thing before, in a book or something. Maybe it’s a common thing for youth groups to do?

  • I agree. I think offering “Halloween Insurance” would be a crime in most states. Wait! Crime does pay? What a great lesson. Next it’ll be “Bully Insurance” and “Car Scratch Insurance” and then “Fire Insurance”.