Bowling for Women

Bowling for Women coverBowling for Women: An Illustrated Guide
Forslund
1964

Submitter: This was on our shelves at our small academic library – I will forward it on to the correct librarian to consider for deselection. My favorite part is the stick figures with hair – and look at the outfits! The only reason I can think of to keep it would be as a historical example.

Holly: The outfits and the hair are soooo dated! More 50’s than 60’s, even. I’m sure this was a Very Important bowling book for the ladies back in the day.  It presents more academic than some I’ve seen, so it probably wasn’t the worst choice for an academic library…more than 50 years ago.

Bowling for Women preface

ball position

beginning bowling

Confidence in relaxed atmosphere

stick figures

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12 comments

  1. I guess the stick figures need to have hair so you’ll know it’s “for women.” It’s like Log For Girls.

    1. What rolls down stairs
      alone or in pairs,
      and over your neighbor’s dog?
      What’s great for a snack,
      And fits on your back?
      It’s log, log, log

      It’s log, it’s log,
      It’s big, it’s heavy, it’s wood.
      It’s log, it’s log, it’s better than bad, it’s good.

      1. Everyone wants a log!
        You’re gonna love it, log!
        C’mon and get your log!
        Everyone needs a log!

        Glad someone liked my reference.

  2. Back in the late 1950s and early 1960s bowling was quite popular. Competitions were the subject of prime time TV shows. For a time, even Milton Berle hosted a bowling show. Bowling was an option for PE in my high school.

    Around 1960 I won a drawing from a local dry cleaner. My prize was a matched set of ball, bag and shoes. I’m left-handed and received a pair of left-handed bowling shoes. I never did very well but I looked great.

    Also, back then, women did wear roomy shirts and dark skirts that ended below the knee. In the 1970s I found a vintage and garish but wonderful pink and turquoise bowling shirt from a hotel in Havana. The embroidery on the pocket said that I was, ‘Tippi’ from the ‘Casino team’.

    Bowling was

  3. Back in the late 1950s and early 1960s bowling was quite popular. Competitions were the subject of prime time TV shows. For a time, even Milton Berle hosted a bowling show. Bowling was an option for PE in my high school.

    Around 1960 I won a drawing from a local dry cleaner. My prize was a matched set of ball, bag and shoes. I’m left-handed and received a pair of left-handed bowling shoes. I never did very well but I looked great

    Also, back then, women did wear roomy shirts and dark skirts that ended below the knee. In the 1970s I found a vintage and garish but wonderful pink and turquoise bowling shirt from a hotel in Havana. The embroidery on the pocket said that I was, ‘Tippi’ from the ‘Casino team’.

    Bowling was fun and good exercise. It’s a bit of a shame that it visn’t more popular these days.

    1. My 16-year-old nephew is on the bowling team at his high school, so maybe it’s making something of a comeback? He even wants to become a pro bowler.

      I remember some of those bowling shows were still on in the early-mid 70s. I can remember watching Bowling for Dollars, and another show called Strikes, Spares, and Misses (that one might have been local to the Buffalo area, though).

      1. If you look at the soles of bowling shoes you’ll see that one has a section of suede at the toe. This is intended to be a sort of brake for the forward foot when the ball is released.

        The forward foot will be different for right and left-handed bowlers.

  4. I’m reminded of old descriptions of ladies playing tennis in the late ’80s — 1880s — in long skirts and feathered hats, and later pictures of them playing in slightly shorter skirts, shirts with ties, and straw boaters. At least these bowling skirts allow freedom of movement.

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